Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:
LAN Parties
Upcoming one-time events:

Regularly scheduled events

Double Fine Crowdsourcing

A Kickstarter campaign to fund development of a new adventure game from Double Fine has immediately taken off, following recent indications from Minecraft creator Notch that he was willing to help fund Psychonauts 2, though the Psychonauts IP is not mentioned by name. This has already raised considerably more than its $400K target, with a single $10K spot sold out, seven out of ten $5K pledges sold, and more than a half-million dollars already in the budget. Here's a explanation:

Keeping the scale of the project this small accomplishes two things. First and foremost, Double Fine gets to make the game they want to make, promote it in whatever manner they deem appropriate, and release the finished product on their own terms. Secondly, since they’re only accountable to themselves, there’s an unprecedented opportunity to show the public what game development of this caliber looks like from the inside. Not the sanitized commercials-posing-as-interviews that marketing teams only value for their ability to boost sales, but an honest, in-depth insight into a modern art form that will both entertain and educate gamers and non-gamers alike.

View
52 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 3 ] Older >

52. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 22:15 Mr. Tact
 
LOL. I totally overlooked that there even was a video on that page. Apparently they didn't embed it the same way everyone else does these days -- which is to say, they didn't shove it in my face. Hence I didn't even notice it. I just thought it was a static .gif -- and I didn't happen to run my cursor over it. I don't know if I'll like the game, but the behind the scenes "movie" seems to have good potential to be interesting at least  
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
51. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 19:17 Sepharo
 
Mr. Tact wrote on Feb 10, 2012, 10:09:
So, anyone have an answer to my question about why they needed to raise money this way? Did their previous games actually do so badly that they have no money?

You should watch the video on the page, it explains why, and it's pretty funny too.
 
Avatar 17249
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
50. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 13:07 Dev
 
creatorswhim wrote on Feb 9, 2012, 17:30:
How long do you guys think it will take for Bobby Kotick to start crowdsourcing Activision's games?

I mean, get the money up front then sell DLC on the back end... sounds like he just doubled Activision's profits.
Isn't that called pre-orders plus extra for year long DLC subscription?
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
49. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 11:08 Mr. Tact
 
I suspect your view is probably more correct than mine was. I simply didn't spend a lot of time thinking about it. I guess it just makes those few success stories even more incredible...  
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
48. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 10:50 nin
 
Mr. Tact wrote on Feb 10, 2012, 10:42:
Right, I realize that. I simply thought that was the Dog Eat Dog world of game developers. Obviously id software is an extreme example, but that was basically 4 guys deciding to make their own games within their own company and the success feed what came later.

I think (and this is just my opinion) id both made a great product starting out, but was also in the right place at the right time. Home PCs were exploding, and their code (Wolf, Doom) was light enough that it could run on just about anything (years before an addin card for 3d would be needed).

Compare them to a company like Raven. Good start, neat games (granted, using other companies engines), but most weren't the huge smash hit. And once they got hitched to working on other peoples properties, they've never quite be able to break free again (with the exception of Singularity, which I'm guessing was funded by Activision and I got the impression didn't do well).

Again, this is all just my view of things (YMMV), and I don't have any financial data to back it up.
 
http://www.nin.com/pub/tension/
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
47. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 10:42 Mr. Tact
 
Right, I realize that. I simply thought that was the Dog Eat Dog world of game developers. Obviously id software is an extreme example, but that was basically 4 guys deciding to make their own games within their own company and the success feed what came later.  
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
46. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 10:35 nin
 
I thought it was more along the lines of, form a company -- get investment backing if necessary. Make a game, sell to a publisher, profits from first game pave the way for the next. Which is why so many development companies start out as VERY small companies, often under 5 people.

If that were the case, all it would take is one flop...and then you're a contract developer. Or you let the big dogs buy you out (and when you're broke, it's that or nothing), but then the company makes what the big dog wants to make.


 
http://www.nin.com/pub/tension/
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
45. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 10:29 Mr. Tact
 
Interesting, so they are essentially a contract developer. Someone pays them to make a game and the money they are paid covers the cost of the development and a small profit. That small profit being insufficient to support development of another game? While that certainly makes some sense, I didn't think it worked like that.

I thought it was more along the lines of, form a company -- get investment backing if necessary. Make a game, sell to a publisher, profits from first game pave the way for the next. Which is why so many development companies start out as VERY small companies, often under 5 people.

 
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
44. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 10:19 nin
 

So, anyone have an answer to my question about why they needed to raise money this way? Did their previous games actually do so badly that they have no money?

Looking at their previous projects, they've either had publisher funding/backing (Brutal Legend, Seseme Street) or it's been an xbox live game. And I doubt you get rich making xbox live games, except in very rare instances.


 
http://www.nin.com/pub/tension/
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
43. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 10:16 Verno
 
Mr. Tact wrote on Feb 10, 2012, 10:09:
So, anyone have an answer to my question about why they needed to raise money this way? Did their previous games actually do so badly that they have no money?

No, they work on a bunch of different projects at once. They've had several successful Steam/XBLA titles over the past few years so I doubt they're running short on money. This is just an experiment, they don't "need" to do it per se but it is difficult getting funding for this style of game so they decided to try something new. I wouldn't bother reading much into it.
 
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: Dark Souls 2
Watching: Legends, Intruders, Apocalypse Now
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
42. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 10:09 Mr. Tact
 
So, anyone have an answer to my question about why they needed to raise money this way? Did their previous games actually do so badly that they have no money?  
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
41. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 09:49 Verno
 
eRe4s3r wrote on Feb 10, 2012, 01:13:
I am gonna bet more than half of the backers did not understand that this has nothing to do with Psychonauts II either (something I would back)

This is just going to be a point and click game, and 1.1m for that? They can ship it with gold engraved manuals but no amount of cash makes a pac game any more than a pac game.

Man you're just Debbie fucking Downer lately, turn that frown upside down mister grumpyface.
 
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: Dark Souls 2
Watching: Legends, Intruders, Apocalypse Now
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
40. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 09:43 nin
 
Mr. Tact wrote on Feb 10, 2012, 07:53:
nin wrote on Feb 9, 2012, 18:49:
One million dollars! Jesus Christ!
Over $1.2 M now, more than 3 times the target.

Just hit 1.3!

 
http://www.nin.com/pub/tension/
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
39. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 08:26 ASeven
 
And now the Planescape dev is looking into Kickstarter to make a new project too.  
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
38. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 07:53 Mr. Tact
 
nin wrote on Feb 9, 2012, 18:49:
One million dollars! Jesus Christ!
Over $1.2 M now, more than 3 times the target.
 
Truth is brutal. Prepare for pain.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
37. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 10, 2012, 01:13 eRe4s3r
 
I am gonna bet more than half of the backers did not understand that this has nothing to do with Psychonauts II either (something I would back)

This is just going to be a point and click game, and 1.1m for that? They can ship it with gold engraved manuals but no amount of cash makes a pac game any more than a pac game.
 
Avatar 54727
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
36. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 9, 2012, 20:36 jdreyer
 
creatorswhim wrote on Feb 9, 2012, 17:30:
How long do you guys think it will take for Bobby Kotick to start crowdsourcing Activision's games?

I mean, get the money up front then sell DLC on the back end... sounds like he just doubled Activision's profits.

Bobby doesn't have the good will to earn any crowdsourcing cash. Tim Schafer does. It's really that simple.
 
Avatar 22024
 
"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
35. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 9, 2012, 20:31 jdreyer
 
Elessar wrote on Feb 9, 2012, 16:14:
jdreyer wrote on Feb 9, 2012, 14:29:
This will be an interesting experiment. Didn't Love try something like this a couple of years ago? Whatever happened to that? With MC, at least Notch had a fairly workable alpha available for people to play around with before they started paying him cash.

With this people are donating based solely on the strength of Tim Schafer and Double Fine's previous work. I'll be watching this to see how things progress. Now, maybe I can use this an excuse to actually go and play Psychonauts which has been sitting in my Steam queue for a year undownloaded and unplayed. Blush
This expiriment reminds me of what Louis CK did with his recent show. I think it was a lot more successful than he anticipated and that seems to be the case here with Double Fine. I'm more than happy to contribute and prove this model works, cutting out the some of bloated and greedy publishers.

And yes, for shame for not playing Psychonauts. Get on that!

Heh. I'm not really in the middle of anything else right now, so I may has well start DL-ing PN.

As for Louis CK, he was actually selling a finished product. If he had said, "Please donate, and if if it gets up $200K I'll make a comedy special and send it to you," do you think he would have gotten $200K? I think the likely answer is yes (cuz he's so awesome), but you can see how that becomes much of a sure thing. In CK's case, he fronted all the cash for the special himself, then sold it. Your average independent dev can't really do that, although Tim Schafer might be able to.
 
Avatar 22024
 
"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
34. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 9, 2012, 20:16 EricFate
 
I want more creative content to be funded like this.

Money up front to buy a product that I know that I want, but that can't seem to get created through normal channels without someone in the middle screwing things up. No marketing people, no stockholders, no publishers who think they are developers, just people who are good at making the type of thing I want given the ability to remain solvent while making something they want and a promise that they will send me a copy when they are finished.

This is already redefining independent music, now it is expanding to game development in a more visible way.

Let the market speak, not the marketers.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
33. Re: Double Fine Crowdsourcing Feb 9, 2012, 19:53 Sepharo
 
Blue this isn't about Psychonauts 2, this is a classic point and click adventure to be developed by Double Fine but designed by Schaefer and Ron Gilbert. Two different projects.  
Avatar 17249
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
52 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 3 ] Older >


footer

Blue's News logo