Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:
LAN Parties
Upcoming one-time events:

Regularly scheduled events

Op Ed

Bitmob.com - Publishers must stop pass-locking multiplayer modes.
And while I'm here, allow me to challenge the notion that publishers pass-lock content for anything other than commercial gain, as opposed to guarding against financial loss. EA now typically online pass-protects multiplayer modes in projected hits (Battlefield 3, Mass Effect 3), so don't think they opened up Syndicate in an altruistic display of heroism. No, they're re-launching a dormant franchise from the '90s, and they don't want to hobble its chances by selling half a game. Same goes for SSX...its online pass doesn't block an entire mode, but will affect how fast you unlock gear.

Sony feels Twisted Metal can ride its reputation all the way to the bank. Syndicate doesn't earn that level of confidence from EA. Mass Effect 3 does. Demand determines accessability. They lock their content accordingly, without regard to the game itself or the people who might want to play it.

These decisions look great on a balance sheet, I'm sure, but those are disastrous moves and here's why: Mode locking keeps people from playing the game, and any plan requiring used-game buyers to pay extra for something they bought on the cheap qualifies as advanced dementia.

View
10 Replies. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 ] Older >

10. Re: Op Ed Feb 10, 2012, 15:53 Dev
 
PHJF wrote on Feb 8, 2012, 16:21:
cdkeys are not void once entered except on Steam (and like services) where a game is account-locked upon activation. I could give you my Q3A cdkey right now and you could use it right now (except they disabled the cdkey check for Q3A ages ago so it's moot). There's a world of difference between a cdkey and a "non-transferable product activation key".
Not just digital services like that. Many cd keys have limited time activations attached to them. Thats gotten less popular in recent years with the increasing popularity of account locking, but prior to that, many many many games had limited activations on keys. Plus, GfWL often had limited activations too.

BTW, this assumes that the internet authentication still passes cd keys as valid. If a company is out of business and didn't patch the authentication out, then the cd key won't pass and games authenticating the cd key over the internet in that case aren't playable without a crack of some sort. Keys like that, even if they weren't designed with limited activation or account locking, still end up being the same effect since one couldn't play the game.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
9. Re: Op Ed Feb 9, 2012, 18:14 spindoctor
 
PHJF wrote on Feb 8, 2012, 16:21:
cdkeys are not void once entered except on Steam (and like services) where a game is account-locked upon activation. I could give you my Q3A cdkey right now and you could use it right now (except they disabled the cdkey check for Q3A ages ago so it's moot). There's a world of difference between a cdkey and a "non-transferable product activation key".

Dades wrote on Feb 8, 2012, 17:01:

Locking game access behind a key and locking specific functionality behind a non-transferable one time activation code are two different things.

A little late to reply here so this will probably go un-noticed, but I'm curious what you think the practical difference is in today's world. For 'big' games it's rare to find a cd key that doesn't permanently link to some kind of account or the other. Otherwise you have things like activation limits which let you have 3 or 5 installs of a game but you can never play them simultaneously.

PC CD keys these days are also "non-transferable one time activation codes" as you guys put them. They have been for at least half a decade now. Pulling out Quake 3 as an example doesn't really mean anything in the reality of 2012.
 
Some of the most miserable and unhappy gamers on the planet are at Bluesnews
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
8. Re: Op Ed Feb 8, 2012, 18:00 Prez
 
I vote to have the game disc coded to your DNA so that no one but you can ever use it again.

These decisions look great on a balance sheet,I'm sure, but those are disastrous moves and here's why: Modelocking keeps people from playing the game,and any plan requiring used-game buyers to pay extra for something they bought on the cheap qualifies as advanced dementia.

I think the writer must have advanced dementia if he can't grasp that the point is to remove the point of buying the used game in the first place.

I still have no idea why this is even an issue. Why it so hard to just buy your games new? You are giving the developers nothing, the slimy used retailer everything, and saving all of 10 bucks. Makes no sense to me.

This comment was edited on Feb 8, 2012, 19:00.
 
Avatar 17185
 
“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
7. Re: Op Ed Feb 8, 2012, 17:01 Dades
 
spindoctor wrote on Feb 8, 2012, 15:43:
As a primarily PC gamer, a platform where this war was lost ages ago, it's kind of interesting to watch this whole online pass/cd key thing unfold on consoles. What is a completely acceptable practice on the PC (locking game access behind a key) is completely new to the console world and they (console gamers and the gaming media which basically revolves around it) seem to be resistant to this idea

Locking game access behind a key and locking specific functionality behind a non-transferable one time activation code are two different things.
 
Avatar 54452
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
6. Re: Op Ed Feb 8, 2012, 16:28 avianflu
 
It is the blockbuster releases that have the most annoying DRM/DLC/on line pass issues.

I am waiting on Mass Effect 3 because I am convinced the release of that game will be some form of DRM disaster for gamers, regardless of platform.


 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
5. Re: Op Ed Feb 8, 2012, 16:21 PHJF
 
cdkeys are not void once entered except on Steam (and like services) where a game is account-locked upon activation. I could give you my Q3A cdkey right now and you could use it right now (except they disabled the cdkey check for Q3A ages ago so it's moot). There's a world of difference between a cdkey and a "non-transferable product activation key".  
Avatar 17251
 
Steam + PSN: PHJF
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
4. Re: Op Ed Feb 8, 2012, 15:43 spindoctor
 
As a primarily PC gamer, a platform where this war was lost ages ago, it's kind of interesting to watch this whole online pass/cd key thing unfold on consoles. What is a completely acceptable practice on the PC (locking game access behind a key) is completely new to the console world and they (console gamers and the gaming media which basically revolves around it) seem to be resistant to this idea.

Unfortunately for them, their protests will go in vain. They will either accept it or stop gaming because the idea of cd keys is going nowhere. Publishers are making tentative steps right now, I can only imagine how hard they will push for it in a couple of years when the next generation of consoles hit.
 
Some of the most miserable and unhappy gamers on the planet are at Bluesnews
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
3. Syndicate Feb 8, 2012, 13:51 jdreyer
 
I'm actually anticipating this game a lot. The trailer looked very cool with all sorts of awesome near-future weapons that not only look cool but add a ton of tactical elements. As long as they polish, balance, and market it, they should do fine. Not that I'm against less DRM.  
Avatar 22024
 
"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
2. Re: Op Ed Feb 8, 2012, 13:17 Cutter
 
Ooh, publishers "must" must they? Sounds like someone's gettin' a little pushy about it.
 
Avatar 25394
 
"The South will boogie again!" - Disco Stu
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
1. Re: Op Ed Feb 8, 2012, 11:46 Verno
 
I agree with the author that there needs to be consistency but its hard to do that from title to title as game features vary. I'm worried about the backend systems for these things though. A few people I know have bought new copies of older titles but the codes included "expired" which is unacceptable IMO. Some countries have started legislating that things like gift cards cannot ever expire and I'd like to see a similar principle adopted in the gaming industry these one time use codes as it's a royal pain in the ass to deal with support about them. You get bounced back and forth between the retailer, publisher and sometimes the developer.

I think the industry could come up with a better solution anyway. Why not use that idea of expiration with the lockouts themselves? It's a similar idea to what DRM systems were trying but failed to accomplish for many years. Protect the integral initial sales period then open it up later on. This would help preserve some multiplayer communities that don't get immediate wildfire success like Call of Duty. I suppose the business answer to that is the continuing drive to get into our wallets more and more often. They don't want to preserve anything, it's all about upconversion to the latest title or DLC. Oh well
 
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: Divinity Original Sin, Destiny, Fire Emblem
Watching: Continuum, Star Trek TNG, Haunt
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
10 Replies. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 ] Older >


footer

.. .. ..

Blue's News logo