Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:
LAN Parties
Upcoming one-time events:

Regularly scheduled events

Op Ed

Gaming Blend - Companies Supported Piracy When It Was Shareware.
Is it possible that bringing back shareware could potentially help curb the amount of piracy happening in both the PC and console arena? Possibly. For the most part shareware represented an age where consumers were in control. Publishers aimed to please. Marketing was about positive word of mouth, not how many trailers, posters and celebrity actors you could get to help promote your game. As a publisher, shareware could make or break you based on the quality of the product. As a gamer, shareware gave you a lot for a little (or nothing at all). As an industry, shareware helped shape the golden age of gaming.

View
25 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 ] Older >

25. Re: Op Ed Feb 7, 2012, 09:14 Verno
 
I see F2P as the modern iteration of shareware, it shares a lot of the same characteristics but its adapted for modern technology.  
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: Dark Souls 2
Watching: Korengal, Legends, Intruders
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
24. Re: Op Ed Feb 7, 2012, 07:04 InBlack
 
Shareware will never make a comeback. Never, ever and for the same 'real' reason why piracy is such a problem to big name publishers.

Its a matter of show and tell. They dont want to show, a shitty game, and they dont want you to tell your friends about said shitty AAA title that costs upwards of 60$ or more.
 
Avatar 46994
 
I have a nifty blue line!
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
23. Re: Op Ed Feb 7, 2012, 03:59 Kajetan
 
Jerykk wrote on Feb 7, 2012, 02:21:
While your extended family may fit into those categories, I imagine that the vast majority of modern gamers do not. Anyone with even a modicum of technical knowledge knows how to start up a torrent, download the files, then follow the included instructions and overwrite the necessary files with the cracked files. And the last part is only necessary if the download isn't pre-cracked, which a lot of torrents are.
Heck, even my slightly technophobic barber told me, he was able to order a modchip and download ROMs for his Nintendo DS after a some simple Google research. And if someone actually dont know, at least he knows someone who does.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
22. Re: Op Ed Feb 7, 2012, 02:21 Jerykk
 
For example, my extended family used to frequently copy and share software in the days before DRM was implemented.

How long ago was this? Because DRM schemes have existed for a long time. Back in the day, some games would require to find specific words in specific lines in specific pages of the manual. Or you'd be forced to use a physical codewheel to get a password.

Even the most rudimentary DRM offers some hindarance to casual piracy, which I believe represents the majority of the gaming marketplace.

The only people who would be hindered by rudimentary DRM are those that:

1) Don't know how to download files.
2) Don't know how to copy and paste files.

While your extended family may fit into those categories, I imagine that the vast majority of modern gamers do not. Anyone with even a modicum of technical knowledge knows how to start up a torrent, download the files, then follow the included instructions and overwrite the necessary files with the cracked files. And the last part is only necessary if the download isn't pre-cracked, which a lot of torrents are.
 
Avatar 20715
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
21. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 20:20 Prez
 
Haha... what's old is new again. Really, this sound like an attempt at re-branding the "paid demo" concept kicked around by EA not too long ago.

The actual days of shareware, like the horse and buggy, are long gone, never to return, though good for nostalgia.
 
Avatar 17185
 
“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
20. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 19:48 Sepharo
 
Beamer wrote on Feb 6, 2012, 13:52:
Remember going to "Computer Shows" and buying a whole bunch of shareware disks?
Inevitably 20% of them were blank or didn't run and at least 1 had a virus.

Then came CDs and you could buy a CD with 100 shareware/demos on it, most of which were crap, half of which wouldn't run and at least one of which was a virus.

I have quite a few of these, when relatives are buying gifts for a 90's PC gamer they can't resist "1000 GAMES!".

What a deal!
 
Avatar 17249
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
19. Re: OT Feb 6, 2012, 18:48 Techie714 ©
 
The Hawken Beta is reserving slots & call signs.

https://playhawken.com/?ref=529dz7b2
 
Avatar 25373
 
Steam (ID)
http://steamcommunity.com/id/techie714/
DEAD SH0T
Keep your privacy!
http://prism-break.org/
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
18. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 18:44 [VG]Reagle
 
Can I pirate the shareware? Becuase if I can I am all in.  
Avatar 8515
 
I am MUCH MUCH MUCH better now.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
17. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 16:50 Silicon Avatar
 
Shareware is still around. It's just called indie now. Instead of passing software around a BBS you pass URLs around and people download demos directly.

Shareware isn't piracy and never was. There did exist plenty of pirated shareware though. People would post full versions and cracked/registered keys just like the do now.

Article is pointless or misinformed - can't decide which..
 
Avatar 18037
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
16. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 16:09 Ruffiana
 
PHJF wrote on Feb 6, 2012, 14:58:
DRM, as insidious as it is, creates some roadblocks to that, forces people who pirate to put in some effort.

It forces The Scene to put in effort, not the end-user.

I disagree. There is a minimal amount of effort that's involved in finding, downloading, and using pirated software. A lot of people are just not technically savy enough to do this.

For example, my extended family used to frequently copy and share software in the days before DRM was implemented. Today, they don't. Further, none of them have ever modified their console hardware or modified their handheld game devices to let them utilize pirated software for those systems.

Even the most rudimentary DRM offers some hindarance to casual piracy, which I believe represents the majority of the gaming marketplace.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
15. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 15:04 space captain
 
PHJF wrote on Feb 6, 2012, 14:58:
DRM, as insidious as it is, creates some roadblocks to that, forces people who pirate to put in some effort.

It forces The Scene to put in effort, not the end-user.

The Scene lives for the effort, they dont need to be forced
 
Go forth, and kill!
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
14. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 14:58 PHJF
 
DRM, as insidious as it is, creates some roadblocks to that, forces people who pirate to put in some effort.

It forces The Scene to put in effort, not the end-user.
 
Avatar 17251
 
Steam + PSN: PHJF
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
13. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 14:46 jdreyer
 
As the old saying goes, "You can't go home again." The shareware model was a product of its time: A nascent PC game industry struggling to exist and needing exposure. There was very little media and awareness. Now that industry is a multibillion dollar industry with billion dollar titles and mainstream media coverage. What worked back then won't work in today's marketplace.

I think the biggest issue with piracy is not the potential lost revenue, but creating a culture of getting it for free. Imagine a world where no games had DRM. The more people pirate, and the more people you know who pirate, the more likely you'll ask yourself, "Why am I paying for this when everyone else is getting it for free?" Hardcore principled folks will still pay, but for many of the fence, the temptation becomes great. DRM, as insidious as it is, creates some roadblocks to that, forces people who pirate to put in some effort. I despise DRM, but I can't blame publishers too much for trying to protect their sales.

There are other things publishers can do to combat piracy than DRM, and I hope they consider these options: a single worldwide release date, a reasonable price, free DLC and support for paying customers, etc.
 
Avatar 22024
 
"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
12. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 14:07 WyldKat
 
Shareware was never piracy, shareware was demo software. I don't really get the point of this article.  
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
11. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 14:05 PHJF
 
Shareware only existed because the internet wasn't yet ubiquitous. Passing shareware around was how a game got exposure.  
Avatar 17251
 
Steam + PSN: PHJF
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
10. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 14:05 Ruffiana
 
This article is pure rose-tinted nostalgia for a by-gone era of gaming.

Shareware games didn't require multi-million dollar investments to get the game onto a disc and out to a customer. We still have shareware. Only now it's a combination of Indy development + DRM-free policies + piracy. And it still only works for a handful of titles.

Mainstream development is heading down the path of free-to-play because 1) it works and 2) it practically eliminates piracy and used game trade.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
9. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 13:54 Cutter
 
Most of the shareware games were also only a few megs big anyway. Now you have demos that are several gigs in size. Again, it's no big secret. Make a good game, make a good demo and people will buy it. It's not rocket surgery.
 
Avatar 25394
 
"The South will boogie again!" - Disco Stu
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
8. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 13:52 Beamer
 
space captain wrote on Feb 6, 2012, 13:25:
i was around when you could only get shareware on floppies from dodgy mail-order places.. back before this internet stuff

it wasnt a "golden age" for shareware.. all the quality titles were retail, and yeh people copied the shit out of some floppies..

so basically, deal with it

Remember going to "Computer Shows" and buying a whole bunch of shareware disks?
Inevitably 20% of them were blank or didn't run and at least 1 had a virus.

Then came CDs and you could buy a CD with 100 shareware/demos on it, most of which were crap, half of which wouldn't run and at least one of which was a virus.

But you'd find occasional jewels, like Slicks'n'Slide, the only game I ever mailed away for.
 
-------------
Music for the discerning:
http://www.deathwishinc.com
http://www.hydrahead.com
http://www.painkillerrecords.com
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
7. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 13:41 nin
 
Alamar wrote on Feb 6, 2012, 11:46:
Nighthawk wrote on Feb 6, 2012, 11:07:
I wish I still had my old Quake 1 shareware CD...

So you could ebay it for the big bucks? : )

-Alamar


Soundtrack!

 
http://www.nin.com/pub/tension/
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
6. Re: Op Ed Feb 6, 2012, 13:25 space captain
 
i was around when you could only get shareware on floppies from dodgy mail-order places.. back before this internet stuff

it wasnt a "golden age" for shareware.. all the quality titles were retail, and yeh people copied the shit out of some floppies..

so basically, deal with it
 
Go forth, and kill!
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
25 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 ] Older >


footer

Blue's News logo