Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:
LAN Parties
Upcoming one-time events:

Regularly scheduled events

CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers?

TorrentFreak reports that lawyers for CD Projekt are contacting individual file-sharers in Germany offering to settle accusations of pirating The Witcher 2 for €911.80 ($1,183.06). For corroboration, they point to this German page which does mention the game and that figure. Thanks Lance via Techdirt, where they note the danger such a "shakedown" can target innocent parties.

View
48 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 3 ] Older >

48. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 22:56 theyarecomingforyou
 
It's already been covered considerably since but I thought I'd contribute anyway. By admitting I had previously pirated games I wasn't trying to claim the "moral highground", rather I was expressing that I was very familiar with both sides of the argument. However, now I buy the games that I like and pass on those I deem to expensive or those that I object to. I do not feel entitled to pirate a game, play it and THEN decide whether I deem it worth the money. Do I miss out on some great games? Yes, but that's life.

I regret that I felt entitled to play games that I refused to pay for. I was young and had no money or source of income, though I don't use that to excuse my actions. I am very critical of those that pirate and do so from a position knowing what it is like to pirate games and knowing how I feel as a paying customer. My Steam account is worth over $4500 and I am happy that I support the games I love.

Thanks for taking the time to read.
 
Avatar 22891
 
SteamID: theyarecomingforyou
Star Citizen: Blue's News
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
47. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 21:03 Endo
 
Thank God I didn't buy this shit.

CD Projekt: welcome to my shit list. There's plenty other good games out there, I don't need your drek. You will not be missed.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
46. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 20:01 TurdFergasun
 
i hope the few of you neo-fascists here step outside the regulations and law one day, by total mistake and end up eating some of this shit justice you're so willing, and eager to hand out.  
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
45. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 17:27 Prez
 
No, it's like someone who was an alcoholic but quit drinking calling alcoholics assholes.

I don't share your opinion either. To use your example, who better than an alcoholic would know what exactly an alcoholic is or isn't? If an ex-alcoholic is calling an alcoholic an asshole, I would tend to think it's because he knows exactly what being an alcoholic entails. I'm all ears for the opinions of ex-offender as long as they give full disclosure about their history. In this case, ex-pirates have done that here. It's got nothing to do with a "moral high ground"; it's got everything to do with knowing how much BS pirates are actually full of when they rationalize their behavior.
 
Avatar 17185
 
“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
44. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 16:14 Kedyn
 
Play with fire - get burned.  
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
43. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 15:08 Verno
 
Bhruic wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 13:31:
I think you're misunderstanding the concept of "moral highground". There's nothing wrong with being a reformed pirate (I am one myself), but you lose the ability to make certain types of references by admitting such. You're not in a position to chastise others for their behaviour when you are guilty of the same behaviour in the past.

You're welcome to your opinion but I don't share it, I don't stick to dictionary definitions alone and I certainly would accept someone else chastising others for behavior they were once guilty of, it just lessens the impact of what they're saying if I find out they're being hypocritical. Someone has already given some examples of it even.
 
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: Gauntlet, Dark Souls 2, Wasteland 2
Watching: Intruders, 24 Live Another Day, The Signal
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
42. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 14:07 Jivaro
 
Bhruic wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 13:31:

That is ridiculous. That is like saying the people who have alcoholism and manage to quit drinking shouldn't try to encourage other alcoholics to quit drinking.

No, it's like someone who was an alcoholic but quit drinking calling alcoholics assholes.

You're not surrendering moral high ground by admitting it, in fact I'm a lot more open to considering arguments from someone who is self aware enough to understand how reality and theoretical arguments differ.

I think you're misunderstanding the concept of "moral highground". There's nothing wrong with being a reformed pirate (I am one myself), but you lose the ability to make certain types of references by admitting such. You're not in a position to chastise others for their behaviour when you are guilty of the same behaviour in the past.

Fair enough. I promise not to call anyone an asshole. Thief, yes, but not an asshole.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
41. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 13:31 Bhruic
 

That is ridiculous. That is like saying the people who have alcoholism and manage to quit drinking shouldn't try to encourage other alcoholics to quit drinking.

No, it's like someone who was an alcoholic but quit drinking calling alcoholics assholes.

You're not surrendering moral high ground by admitting it, in fact I'm a lot more open to considering arguments from someone who is self aware enough to understand how reality and theoretical arguments differ.

I think you're misunderstanding the concept of "moral highground". There's nothing wrong with being a reformed pirate (I am one myself), but you lose the ability to make certain types of references by admitting such. You're not in a position to chastise others for their behaviour when you are guilty of the same behaviour in the past.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
40. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 13:13 Verno
 
Bhruic wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 09:36:
See, when you've already admitted that you "used to" pirate games, it is much, MUCH too late for you to be taking the moral highground.

I pretty much agree with everything else you said but this is silly. Pretty much every computer user these days has committed piracy whether they know it or not. You're not surrendering moral high ground by admitting it, in fact I'm a lot more open to considering arguments from someone who is self aware enough to understand how reality and theoretical arguments differ.
 
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: Gauntlet, Dark Souls 2, Wasteland 2
Watching: Intruders, 24 Live Another Day, The Signal
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
39. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 12:57 Ruffiana
 
Cutter wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 01:47:
I lovw how they pull these arbitrary numbers out of their ass. When I was 12 or so I got caught stealing a chocolate bar. The cop made me pay for it, took me home and talked to my folks, my dad whupped my ass and that was the end of that. And I'm pretty sure that anyone going to court for petty theft/shoplifting these days doesn't get hit with these sorts of absurd damage claims so what makes digital media - which doesn't even result in any actual physical loss of an item - any different? Why aren't there police investigations to determine if a crime was actually commited before it heads to court? Shouldn't the prosecutors office only then determine if there are sufficient grounds to go to court? Where is the burden of proof? The onus is on the accuser. At least where due process is involved.

Of course there's punitive damages for stealing, otherwise there's no risk to anyone for stealing anything. If you get caught, you just return the item or pay for it? How would that be a deterrent?

This whole idea of digital media being different because there's no physical item involved is bullshit. It's the value of the item that matters. Intellectual property, formulas, copyright material, mechanical designs, virtual goods, there's a whole host of things with real, monetary value that you can't just dismiss as being okay for people to steal simply because it's not a widget in a box sitting on a store shelf.

This comment was edited on Dec 15, 2011, 13:08.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
38. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 12:49 Ruffiana
 
Rattlehead wrote on Dec 14, 2011, 22:26:
Yea might as well let pirates get away consequence free

It's not the pirates, it's the people putting up games for pirates to download. I can't make any distinction between someone who does that and someone who physically copies a disc, sticks it in a box, and sells it for $20 over EBay. It's illegal duplication and distribution of copyrighted material, whether they're making a profit for doing it or not they should face the same consequences.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
37. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 11:01 Jivaro
 
Bhruic wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 09:36:
See, when you've already admitted that you "used to" pirate games, it is much, MUCH too late for you to be taking the moral highground.

That is ridiculous. That is like saying the people who have alcoholism and manage to quit drinking shouldn't try to encourage other alcoholics to quit drinking.

This comment was edited on Dec 15, 2011, 11:29.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
36. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 10:57 Jivaro
 
TurdFergasun wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 05:54:
well for anyone in germany with a grudge, it's time to go wardriving to download witcher2. regardless of the reasoning it's totally bullshit, might as well just call piracy witchcraft at this point and start burning ppl at the stake. IP is not ID in any stretch of the deffinition. anyone who thinks this is justified should gimme their address and 1/2 hour with aircrack parked just inside your wifi range with a gpu accelerated laptop. would be so simple for any of your neighbors to be downloading this off you right now.

Of course you could...but when the physical evidence isn't on the hard drive of the actual IP owners, the case dies. The IP is merely a starting point. At least I would hope Germany's laws would put the burden of proof on CD Projekt. If it doesn't, perhaps the problem is actually the laws eh?

Encouraging people to pirate as some sort of retaliation is just showing that people will use any excuse to steal. Don't buy the game, don't play the game....don't show interest in the game. That is how you hurt publishers/developers.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
35. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 10:33 elefunk
 
Reikon wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 02:02:
elefunk wrote on Dec 14, 2011, 23:22:
Why would anyone be against this? Unlike other companies that go after pirates, CD Projekt isn't doing anything to legitimate customers. Literally the only people who have anything to worry about are people who aren't even customers.

So you've never had issues with RIAA or MPAA's tactics? I'm sure a lot more people would be against this if CD Projekt were replaced with RIAA or MPAA in this article.
The RIAA and MPAA are actively prosecuting countless people who in some cases have not pirated at all, and at the same time, they're restricting their media with DRM and other horribly-anti-consumer practices. CD Projekt could not be further from them.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
34. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 09:36 Bhruic
 
That's a deliberate obfuscation of the reality. An IP address can be identified by the ISP that issued it, while the local IP address can ascertain which computer / device on the network accessed it.

And that's spouted nonsense. The ISP has a record of who is paying for a connection, period. They don't know who's actually using the connection, they don't know what computers are behind the connection, they don't know if the connection is shared, or whether there's an open wireless connection. So if they get contacted about an ip address, they can't give them any of that information. All the company gets is the name of the person who "owns" the connection. And is not sufficient to demonstrate who actually downloaded the game from that ip. And anyone with a basic understanding of how the internet works should know that.

You're trying to introduce doubt in an attempt to let those infringing copyright off the hook.

Yes, because CD Projekt is going to stop doing it just because I posted! I just have that much influence over them.

How about people just buy the fucking game or pass on it, like the rest of us do.

See, when you've already admitted that you "used to" pirate games, it is much, MUCH too late for you to be taking the moral highground.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
33. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 09:27 Armengar
 
RE: WyldKat

Assuming mph means you live in the UK. Sentencing guidelines would say 100 in a 60 would be hard to avoid a short ban. I'd hazard £400 fine, 30-50 day ban depending on how much of an arse you are in court, £50 victim "fine". Your insurance would go through the roof.

100 in 70 is mitigatable to avoid the ban but certainly circa £250 fine (plus £50) and maybe 4-6 points if you are lucky.

God help you if it was raining as they might tack a DWDCA so its a ban + points and a double fine. Cause'd someone else to swerve or tailgate? Thats DD so automatic long ban (and it stays on your licence for double), £1k fine (+£50) and possibly jailtime.

104 is the magic number, then jail time or even pass it up to CC as its an each way offence.
 
Its not the cough that carries you off but the coffin they carry you off in.
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
32. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 09:24 theyarecomingforyou
 
InBlack wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 07:17:
Not a smart move, it will be seen in a negative light but more importantly it will cost them money.

The whole procedure is probably quite expensive, and I shudder to think what will happen when a few wrongly indicted people decide to sue.
Well, that's up to them to decide. If it costs more than it recovers and it generates negative publicity then it would be counter-productive.

Bhruic wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 08:58:
There are people saying it's wrong, and for a very good reason. An ip address is not a form of identification. Unless you have a (relatively) foolproof way of identifying exactly who downloaded the game, sending out emails, especially threatening "settlement" emails, is wrong.
That's a deliberate obfuscation of the reality. An IP address can be identified by the ISP that issued it, while the local IP address can ascertain which computer / device on the network accessed it. Mistakes have been made in the past but that has largely been because companies like the MPAA / RIAA were taking shortcuts due to the number of lawsuits they were filing. You're trying to introduce doubt in an attempt to let those infringing copyright off the hook.

I'm fed up with all the bullshit around here. Pirating software isn't allowed and wanting to try a fully functioning "demo" is not even close to a valid excuse. And if you pirate a game you risk the legal or civil action associated with it. How about people just buy the fucking game or pass on it, like the rest of us do. Oh yeah, I forgot how society owes it to you to let you pirate stuff. Wall

Just because they oppose DRM doesn't mean they shouldn't take action against those people stealing (cue all the 'piracy isn't stealing' nonsense - yeah I get it, piss off) their product.
 
Avatar 22891
 
SteamID: theyarecomingforyou
Star Citizen: Blue's News
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
31. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 09:06 Zoom
 
The multiple fallacies here are they believe downloaders
- are pirates (and make money off their back)
- wont buy any of their products
- wont give them free advertisement (Witcher series got quite far on word of mouth...)
Free downloaders or not, they are their user base. See how well suing your user base worked for the MAFIAA...
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
30. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 08:58 Bhruic
 

I dont think that anyone is saying that what CD Projekt is doing is wrong, its simply stupid.

There are people saying it's wrong, and for a very good reason. An ip address is not a form of identification. Unless you have a (relatively) foolproof way of identifying exactly who downloaded the game, sending out emails, especially threatening "settlement" emails, is wrong.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
29. Re: CD Projekt Versus File-Sharers? Dec 15, 2011, 08:48 Parallax Abstraction
 
eRe4s3r wrote on Dec 15, 2011, 02:02:
Wow, that is truly unreal.. i mean sure you get seized your driving license if you go 50km/h above the limit here (germany) (if its in a city or town) but a 10000$ fine? Seizure of the VEHICLE? What kind of punishment is that?

That is just way way too harsh a punishment for a petty offense

It was a stupid reactionary move for our inept provincial government to a sudden (and temporary) rise in deaths that were attributed to street racing a few years back. If you do 50 over the limit, you're considered to be "racing", even if it's just you doing it and they felt they had to "get tough on street racing" which is why they passed this stupid law. Of course, it hasn't done anything to deter idiots who race on public streets (at least not in Ottawa where I live) and you know, a real solution like subsidising one of the multiple proposals that were offered to build public tracks where these people could race safely off the streets were never considered. And this province just voted that idiot in again!
 
Parallax Abstraction
Geek Bravado | YouTube
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
48 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 3 ] Older >


footer

Blue's News logo