Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:
LAN Parties
Upcoming one-time events:

Regularly scheduled events

GOG.com: "Your customers hate DRM"

"Your customers hate DRM," GOG.com's Guillaume Rambourg explained to the assemblage at the London Games Conference. "DRM is making companies feel safe while they handle some business, they are trying to protect their product and protect their sales, but the reality is very different." This is noted on GamesIndustry.biz (registration required), where they note that while The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings sold something around 200,000 units on Steam, CD Projekt RED's action/RPG sequel sold more DRM-free units on GOG.com than all other digital distributors combined. Here are a few more quotes on the topic:

"The reality is DRM does not protect your content. Every game is pirated within a few hours of release or more often before it's released. DRM is not protecting your product or your sales, it's going to harm your sales in the long run."

"By putting DRM in your games you are working against your consumers, you are harming those you should cherish. It's only hurting your loyal consumers which is counter-productive."

"There is one industry that got everything right - piracy. Piracy quickly understood that digital needs to be simple and easy. That digital consumers are expecting a fast and easy experience. You should treat piracy as competition not as an enemy. If you treat it as an enemy you are blinded and you don't pay attention to what they are doing right."

View
30 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 ] Older >

30. Re: GOG.com: Nov 13, 2011, 12:59 Noctis
 
I agree! I hate it so much I don't even buy steam games. No Skyrim for me. There are plenty of other games out there that I can play instead.  
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
29. Re: GOG.com: Nov 13, 2011, 08:09 Jerykk
 
Flatline wrote on Nov 13, 2011, 05:25:
Krovven wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 13:23:
And the reason they don't get new games on GoG, is because of their no-DRM stance.


Err... dude... GoG stands for Good Old Games. Not "Good New Games" I understand why the released Witcher 2 through GOG, that makes sense since it's their own distribution platform, but the whole point of the website is that they get games working on your windows 7 computer that you probably wish you could still play. Hence the whole "old" thing.

I mean, it wasn't even until Witcher 2 came close to launching that they released Witcher 1 on their service. For the first year or so you couldn't buy Witcher 1 on the site.

I love GOG but the acronym doesn't really mean much anymore. A lot of the games they sell were never considered "good" at any point in history and some of their games aren't even that old. As Dagok said, the main reason they aren't selling new games is because publishers still believe that DRM is necessary. They only agree to have it removed for old games because they stopped getting revenue from those games years ago. If GOG could convince them to allow DRM-free versions to be sold, you can bet your ass that GOG would be selling new games. You can also bet that I'd be buying them.
 
Avatar 20715
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
28. Re: GOG.com: Nov 13, 2011, 05:25 Flatline
 
Krovven wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 13:23:
And the reason they don't get new games on GoG, is because of their no-DRM stance.


Err... dude... GoG stands for Good Old Games. Not "Good New Games" I understand why the released Witcher 2 through GOG, that makes sense since it's their own distribution platform, but the whole point of the website is that they get games working on your windows 7 computer that you probably wish you could still play. Hence the whole "old" thing.

I mean, it wasn't even until Witcher 2 came close to launching that they released Witcher 1 on their service. For the first year or so you couldn't buy Witcher 1 on the site.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
27. Re: GOG.com: "Your customers hate DRM" Nov 12, 2011, 00:16 tuddies
 
Guillaume's perspective of piracy being the competition is spot-on. Just bought a couple of games on GOG and they really deliver on this concept by providing fantastic, easy-to-use, DRM-free entertainment!

You go, GOG!
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
26. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 23:27 TheVocalMinority
 
CJ_Parker wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 21:55:
shponglefan wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 17:24:
So therefore most of their customers are willing to put up with DRM... seems to negate their argument.

I'm 100% sure that if you asked around then you'd find out very quickly that the average gamer Joe does...

blah blah blah

Maybe the real issue isn't that customers hate DRM, but that developers hate their customers?
 
Assley Putz
"Was vocalminority assley putzs most recent handle?"
-nin May 16, 2012, 10:52
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
25. Re: GOG.com: "Your customers hate DRM" Nov 11, 2011, 22:06 Riker
 
I love this guy.  
Avatar 6580
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
24. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 21:55 CJ_Parker
 
shponglefan wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 17:24:
So therefore most of their customers are willing to put up with DRM... seems to negate their argument.

I'm 100% sure that if you asked around then you'd find out very quickly that the average gamer Joe does...

a) ... not give a shit if a game uses DRM
b) ... even less of a shit what type of DRM is being used
c) ... not even know or realize that Steam is DRM

I'm also sure that a very sizable portion of average gamer Joes prolly doesn't even know what "DRM" really is or what the acronym even stands for in the first place.

But what Mr. Average Gamer Joe does know very well is where to find and download free games because Mr. Average Gamer Joe has an average income and expensive hobbies like a girlfriend. When given the choice whether to spend $60 on a game or $60 on a dinner with Mrs. Average Gamer Jane then Mr. Average Gamer Joe will save his money by grabbing a warez copy of the games he likes to be able to afford keeping the missus happy.

It would be foolish to believe that people pirate to take a stance or to make a statement. In the vast majority of cases I'm sure that piracy is simply a lifestyle choice. Many people simply choose to play their games for free because free games are so easily and readily available.

I'm finding it outright crazy if I see people (usually the ones who justify and advocate piracy) on this site claiming that piracy does not mean lost sales. You have to be blind, deaf and dumb to seriously believe that shit. Piracy is hurting PC gaming like mad and anyone denying this fact is just adding nails to the coffin Black & Decker style.

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
23. Re: GOG.com: "Your customers hate DRM" Nov 11, 2011, 21:35 Creston
 
I can just see some Ubisoft cuntstool listening to this, and going "Why, I never...!"

Fucktards.

Creston
 
Avatar 15604
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
22. Re: GOG.com: "Your customers hate DRM" Nov 11, 2011, 19:09 entr0py
 
The trouble is not that videogame developers and publishers don't understand that DRM is useless against piracy and angers paying customers. It's that those developers and publishers have, for years, deliberately tried to convince share holders that DRM protects their investment from piracy.

They are the source of the myth about DRM being useful. It was never a misunderstanding on the part of publishers, it is their scam, they know how it works.
 
Avatar 55038
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
21. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 18:09 Bhruic
 
Piracy is doing so well because it's taking a product that has monetary value, made by someone else, and giving it away for free. Hard enough stretch for me to believe that piracy has no effect on sales, don't expect me to swallow the lie that people only pirate because of the inconvenience of DRM.

Where did you get that "only" from? I don't think anyone ever said that people wouldn't pirate anything if there was no DRM. They did say that DRM contributes to people's inclination to pirate things.

Anti-DRM people seem to be blind to the actual trends in the industry, which are a move away from packaged products protected by innefectual DRM to something that is free from the start.

That's the trend for MMOs, I don't think you can (yet) justifiably say it's the trend in general. Most "normal" games still require you to buy them to play.

Even MW3, one of the largest commercial releases ever is starting to drift over to this model of the game being there to support a service that people pay for (though they're greedily double and triple dipping because fuck it...why not, they can).

You're confusing post-sale commodization with up-front sales. The CoD franchise has no plans on going free.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
20. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 17:24 shponglefan
 
jacobvandy wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 17:13:
I think he's referring to the fact that, aside from Steam, GOG.com sold more than Impulse, D2D, GamersGate, etc. combined. The number for "everyone but Steam and GOG" is less than 10,000 copies.

So therefore most of their customers are willing to put up with DRM... seems to negate their argument.
 
Avatar 54594
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
19. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 17:17 Draugr
 
jacobvandy wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 17:13:
CptStern wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 17:03:
"The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings sold something around 200,000 units on Steam, CD Projekt RED's action/RPG sequel sold more DRM-free units on GOG.com than all other digital distributors combined. "

that's the opposite of this source:

"Roughly 240,000 copies of The Witcher 2 were sold across all digital distribution platforms between its May 17 launch and October 30, CD Projekt revealed. Steam accounted for over 195,000 of these (around 81%), while Good Old Games rung up "approximately" 35,000 (15%)."

Source
so which one is it?

I think he's referring to the fact that, aside from Steam, GOG.com sold more than Impulse, D2D, GamersGate, etc. combined. The number for "everyone but Steam and GOG" is less than 10,000 copies.

CDPr also removed their DRM from all copies of the game after the release date, so technically they are all DRM free.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
18. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 17:13 jacobvandy
 
CptStern wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 17:03:
"The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings sold something around 200,000 units on Steam, CD Projekt RED's action/RPG sequel sold more DRM-free units on GOG.com than all other digital distributors combined. "

that's the opposite of this source:

"Roughly 240,000 copies of The Witcher 2 were sold across all digital distribution platforms between its May 17 launch and October 30, CD Projekt revealed. Steam accounted for over 195,000 of these (around 81%), while Good Old Games rung up "approximately" 35,000 (15%)."

Source
so which one is it?

I think he's referring to the fact that, aside from Steam, GOG.com sold more than Impulse, D2D, GamersGate, etc. combined. The number for "everyone but Steam and GOG" is less than 10,000 copies.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
17. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 17:03 CptStern
 
"The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings sold something around 200,000 units on Steam, CD Projekt RED's action/RPG sequel sold more DRM-free units on GOG.com than all other digital distributors combined. "

that's the opposite of this source:

"Roughly 240,000 copies of The Witcher 2 were sold across all digital distribution platforms between its May 17 launch and October 30, CD Projekt revealed. Steam accounted for over 195,000 of these (around 81%), while Good Old Games rung up "approximately" 35,000 (15%)."

Source
so which one is it?
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
16. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 16:58 yuastnav
 
Wallshadows wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 16:52:
So, someone speaks out against DRM which is usually the bane of existence and instead of agreeing with the guy, most are more concerned about the financial impact it will have on that service?

Can't catch a break on here for anything I guess...

Heh, you took the words right out of my mind.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
15. Re: GOG.com: "Your customers hate DRM" Nov 11, 2011, 16:52 Wallshadows
 
So, someone speaks out against DRM which is usually the bane of existence and instead of agreeing with the guy, most are more concerned about the financial impact it will have on that service?

Can't catch a break on here for anything I guess...
 
Avatar 50040
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
14. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 14:15 saluk
 
Kajetan wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 10:39:
Some of them may hate DRM, yes.

Some other customers aka emotional addicts will do whatever you say. You can rape them and they still thank you for your kindness, when you give them an old rag that they can clean themselves up. THATS the people you should cherish as your customers.

Most of them hate it too. They keep going back for a fix, and then feeling sad and ashamed in the morning when they wake up in a dumpster.

It's cool of gog to speak out, but they are pissing in the wind. They have some anecdotal evidence (hooray!), and it's probably true that there are a lot of other games which would make their publishers MORE money instead of LESS (which I think is the point here) without DRM, but they are really pissing in the wind here.

The trail from scarcity to information based economics is a strange one. I make no predictions lol.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
13. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 13:30 Mashiki Amiketo
 
Prez wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 10:59:
Hear that sound? It's the sound of a nail being hit on its head. Good on ya, CD Projekt.
I dunno. Doesn't sound like a nail being hit on the head to me. It sounds like the work of a master smith, forging a piece of masterwork. You can still hear the ringing echo.
 
--
"For every human problem,
there is a neat, simple solution;
and it is always wrong."
--H.L. Mencken
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
12. Re: GOG.com: Nov 11, 2011, 13:23 Krovven
 
ElectricTurtle wrote on Nov 11, 2011, 10:46:
but if they convince others to drop DRM then they are creating competition for themselves. Right now they have almost a monopoly on DRM-free games

Which means nothing until they get new games (other than their own) on GoG. I've only bought 1 game from GoG, Witcher 2. I'm not interested in paying $3-6 for 15+ year old games I will never touch again.

And the reason they don't get new games on GoG, is because of their no-DRM stance.

 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
11. Re: GOG.com: "Your customers hate DRM" Nov 11, 2011, 13:06 Ruffiana
 
Quick, someone tell Activision that DRM will hurt their sales or else MW3 won't make any money!

One slight correction to make here, that I personally think makes all the difference:
"Piracy quickly understood that digital needs to be simple, easy, and free."

Piracy is doing so well because it's taking a product that has monetary value, made by someone else, and giving it away for free. Hard enough stretch for me to believe that piracy has no effect on sales, don't expect me to swallow the lie that people only pirate because of the inconvenience of DRM.

Anti-DRM people seem to be blind to the actual trends in the industry, which are a move away from packaged products protected by innefectual DRM to something that is free from the start. Even MW3, one of the largest commercial releases ever is starting to drift over to this model of the game being there to support a service that people pay for (though they're greedily double and triple dipping because fuck it...why not, they can).

That's the future landscape of games things that don't need to be pirated software from quesitonable sources because they're already available for free through legitimate sources. Anyone who thinks that things will be just like they are now, just without DRM is delluding themselves.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
30 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
< Newer [ 1 2 ] Older >


footer

Blue's News logo