Send News. Want a reply? Read this. More in the FAQ.   News Forum - All Forums - Mobile - PDA - RSS Headlines  RSS Headlines   Twitter  Twitter
Customize
User Settings
Styles:
LAN Parties
Upcoming one-time events:

Regularly scheduled events

On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans

A post on the Bohemia Interactive Forums asks for help with a problem causing a watery image degradation in Take On Helicopters, Bohemia's new flight simulator. As it turns out this can be the result of using a pirated edition of the game, as Bohemia explains this comes from their "unique anti-piracy countermeasures," also noting a demo for the game is in the works. Here's word:

Bohemia Interactive deploys various antipiracy countermeasures in its titles and Take On Helicopters is no exception, some users have reported morphed/watery image degradation (see http://forums.bistudio.com/showthread.php?t=126991 ). The original version of Take On Helicopters does not suffer from this degradation of visual quality. Piracy is a big problem for Bohemia Interactive, as an independent PC developer, and we're trying to focus our support as much as possible towards users of legitimate copies. Counterfeit copies of our games may degrade and, moral aspects aside, we certainly recommend only playing the original version. We have a free public demo version of Take On Helicopters in the development pipeline for those that prefer to test it before buying.

View
60 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 2.
< Newer [ 1 2 3 ] Older >

40. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 19:55 Dades
 
Spaced wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 19:11:
Maybe you weren't paying attention...

Maybe you aren't paying attention because pretty much every DRM system ever conceived has been cracked, even the vaunted Ubisoft DRM with thousands of online checks and database code inserts. Once the game has shipped you can't go back and insert better DRM. This DRM doesn't work because it's not preventing piracy and only causes confusion, its that simple. DRM inconveniences people who spend money more than people who don't and the rest of the time it is mostly a worthless effort. The best DRM is a great multiplayer side, spend the time and money on that which will also make a better game for your customers.
 
Avatar 54452
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
39. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 19:42 Dev
 
bfg9000 wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 19:22:
I have been playing Arma2 since release and have never had problems with FADE. You don't even need to have the CD inserted.
A DRM that has no negative effect on legit users? In this day and age?
Nothing short of a miracle.

Just because YOU didn't have problems, doesn't mean every other user has the same experience. I see that a lot in online forums, people assuming their life experience must be the same as everyone elses, and if something did or didn't happen to them it must be the same for all.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
38. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 19:22 bfg9000
 
I have been playing Arma2 since release and have never had problems with FADE. You don't even need to have the CD inserted.
A DRM that has no negative effect on legit users? In this day and age?
Nothing short of a miracle.
 
Avatar 43855
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
37. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 19:11 Spaced
 
Rattlehead wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 18:48:
DRM doesn't work.

Maybe you weren't paying attention... it did work in this instance with a much more effective and less intrusive method of DRM. It may get cracked, but new and better systems will likely come along. And this method is much better than other methods by not interfering with legal users. And with members of Skidrow and reloaded being prosecuted and put in jail, that would help too.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
36. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 18:48 Rattlehead
 
Why bother with this DRM at all...all that happens is hacker groups like Skidrow and reloaded have a challenge of who can release a crack that circumvents this faster. It happened with Batman Arkham Asylum.

DRM doesn't work.
 
Avatar 55889
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
35. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 17:55 Spaced
 
Majority of DRM solutions on the market today are not done by game developers, but by 3rd parties

Exactly, and I addressed 3rd party systems in my earlier posts. The system in this game though is a built-in solution requiring none of the expense or user hassles of the systems you describe and cite.

and I've seen smaller companies that become known for buggy software when the bugs are intentional in the pirate versions.

Like? Probably only a few and smaller developers. But this is an area that hasn't really been developed much, it needs some fine tuning and tweaking just like any other software advancement does. And so far, the implementation in this game is proving to be very effective without impacting legal users at all.

An arms war with pirates would probably result in something like starforce... The end result of an arms war would be terrible for legit consumers, and cost companies significant money that they probably can't afford.

Well, my suggestion didn't involve any 3rd party DRM option at all, only the kind of approach this game is taking which is entirely built-in and very cost/time effective. Then as needed the next step could be developers pooling resources to prosecute piracy and jail some in an effort to stop the problem at the source.

With as easy as it is to implement this kind of protection, a developer could add 365 different side effects (or any random trigger), one for each day of the year and none of which could be removed without breaking the game entirely (all inter-dependent code). So whatever worked one day would fail the next and every day after it. No need for intrusive and restrictive DRM and no impact for the legal user. Again, the legal user would never know the difference because their legally purchased version just works like it's supposed to. Only the illegal users would run into problems. It's an excellent approach and a step in the -right- direction as opposed to some recent DRM approaches.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
34. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 17:34 Dev
 
Spaced wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 14:44:
Verno wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 14:33:
They want to get into an arms war, with Pirates?

Actually, maybe they should. Developers have been losing this battle for a long long time. Maybe its time they stand up and start to seriously fight with new approaches like this.

Majority of DRM solutions on the market today are not done by game developers, but by 3rd parties, companies that specialize in it (the main exception is companies that run digital platforms, such as steam). Such as securom, etc. Most game companies simply don't have the resources. Want to see a good example of an software arms race? Look an anti-virus software. Its nearly all done by 3rd parties, and there's many many thousands of new threats that hit every year. It rarely pays off for game studios to invest a lot of resources into it, and I've seen smaller companies that become known for buggy software when the bugs are intentional in the pirate versions. Intentional bugs in pirate versions are not exactly a new approach.

An arms war with pirates would probably result in something like starforce, something thats essentially a rootkit and goes to crazy extreme measures to try and keep games under DRM. It worked... for a while. I recall some early starforce titles taking months to get a crack. Ubisoft's always on DRM also worked for a while, with their first titles taking weeks. The end result of an arms war would be terrible for legit consumers, and cost companies significant money that they probably can't afford.



Far far better to use the carrot instead of the stick. Give updates with additional content to legit customers (such as stardock did with impulse and their titles). Maybe let someone register on a company forum with a legit serial and give them an exclusive in game item.

Most of the time, DRM only really helps prevent pre-release piracy (not nearly as much of that on PC anymore, it sure happens a lot on consoles though), and if the company is lucky, a couple/few days after release until its cracked. So why not accept it? Drop the DRM after a year and most of the sales have been done, then you can draw in the customers that hate all forms of DRM (such as egosoft with the X series of games, they drop the DRM after a while in a patch). Brings the game back into the spotlight with news releases a year later since dropping DRM is unusual. Sadly too few companies and titles do this. It also helps to insure their games remain playable in the years to come after they stop supporting them (or go out of business). Sometimes older titles REQUIRE a crack to even play nowadays.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
33. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 17:31 ^mortis^
 
this is HI-larious and I approve.


^m^
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
32. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 16:55 Quboid
 
I wouldn't let someone make the decision, but it would influence my actions. How do I research without being subject to peoples' agendas? Its official site, reviews, fan sites, even a demo, they are all subject to hidden and/or subconscious agendas. Someone - not just anyone, but a regular on this site - telling me that it is buggy will decrease what little interest I had in this title.

Gauging the mood on Bluesnews is as good a way as any to pick up information on what's better than it sounds or worse than it sounds. I can't experience everything first hand and I can't research everything. I'm confident that the regulars here aren't in anyone's pocket - however, some of us may be reporting on a pirate copy of a game.

It's not reliable, but without unlimited time and money, it's necessary. Developers who make this worse are shooting themselves in the foot.
 
Avatar 10439
 
- Quboid
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
31. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 16:49 Spaced
 
Instead you must add value and convenience to the legitimate version,

Like, working properly?

while reducing the value and convenience of the pirated version.

Like, not working properly?

I say this method of 'DRM' achieves boths goals exactly as stated as opposed to other forms of DRM. With this approach, the thieves can't steal it and the legal user never knows the difference because it never effects them. An elegant and effective solution.

The problem with something like this is that you won't get those conversions from pirate to buyer (however rare or common they are.) Worse, you'll have really bad word of mouth and claims of bugginess dissuading real buyers as they talk on messageboards to people they don't realize are pirates.

Right, and so the distrust should be placed with the subjective comments and 'bug claims'. And that distrust is created and fostered by the pirates. So they really do hurt the industry and advancement of our games in several different ways.

But to say that people who download cracked software spread trojans and never buy software is pure ignorance.

Who said they -never- buy software? Can you quote where that was stated?

And it is a fact that illegal software is a primary source of trojans, malware, and viruses. Including stuff your anti-virus software can't pick up, such as a backdoor being opened on your system so it can be used later at a hacker's discretion to further spread malware and viruses. Not only is the software a risk, but even the websites that carry it can infect you by visiting the sites, even without downloading anything! To deny the problem is to just deny reality and you're inviting the problem onto your system when you participate and risk spreading infections to others by doing so.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
30. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 16:41 tuddies
 
Spaced wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 14:28:
Quboid wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 13:56:
Pirates are going to think your game is buggy and neither buy any of your stuff nor recommend it.

Lol, that's funny! They didn't buy the game in the first place and you think they would buy it eventually after stealing it? That's a riot! No loss for the developer there at all, lol. Good riddance to the thief and all their 'friends'.

Plus, who in their right mind would ever accept a recommendation from a pirate? Oh yeah, lets listen to the very people who steal and help spread trojans, viruses, and malware for our PC game recommendations. That's laugh #2!

This DRM actually seems pretty effective and user friendly (for -legal- users). They get to find out who is stealing their software, the software stops working when the developer decides, and it alerts others. That's very good compared to restrictive use problems for legal users with some DRM systems. Nice! Others should start using this kind of thing more and move away from some of the restrictive DRM methods that hurt legitimate users.

You have no idea what you are talking about!

Piracy has been shown time and time again to boost sales, and people who use cracked software also buy it on occasion. If the DRM doesn't affect legitimate users, then good job. But to say that people who download cracked software spread trojans and never buy software is pure ignorance.

On a personal note, I have had trouble with just getting a simple CDKEY to work with a bought version of Arma2, and emailing BIS support with a scan of my manual to confirm the serial never helped. I had to use a cracked EXE to launch my store-bought copy! While this may be an exception to the rule, I was glad to have a DRM-free version of the EXE to play my retail copy. For AO, I bought it online, and much appreciated the paul.dll verification.

It still leaves a bad taste in my mouth that I was getting FADE activated on my legal copy, and whenever I miss a target all that I can think about is "HAS FADE KICKED IN"? I miss a lot of targets, so this unpleasant thought is a painful reminder of my bad experience with BIS's DRM implementation.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
29. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 16:38 Frijoles
 
Beelzebud wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 15:08:
I've heard of Operation Flashpoint, and Arma, but Bohemian Interactive is not a name I had heard until all the DRM talk this week. Been a PC gamer since the TI 99/4a, I just don't get all groupie acting about companies.

Same here. I've heard of the games, not the developer though. Apparently they're big in to the DRM scene though.
 
Avatar 6700
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
28. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 16:36 Spaced
 
Quboid wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 15:50:
Are you really claiming that you aren't influenced at all by what comments other people make?

Did I say that? No. I simply asked if you really let other people form your opinions for you. It doesn't have to be final or objective (certainly most game comments are subjective anyway), but apparently, you do let others decide for you what you will and won't be interested in:

I asked a question on Bluesnews a few days ago about this very game, basically asking if it was any good. If someone had replied "nah, it's so buggy, I could hardly make out anything on screen", then I'd have been even less likely to buy the game.

So if 'someone' had replied that it was buggy, you might give up on it and be less likely to buy it. So in effect, you let the 'someone' make the decision for you based on a 'nah, it's so buggy' comment. Sounds like you are pretty easy to manipulate... even when you don't know who is controlling you or what motives/agendas/abilities/knowledge they may have. You should be more objective and not 'buy' into what other people tell you on the internet so easily.

Better to research what you are interested in to form your opinion beyond just what other people say. But of course, that's my opinion :-)
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
27. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 16:24 Prez
 
theyarecomingforyou wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 15:32:

As for the copy protection, if you're going to implement any protection then it should be like this - something that disadvantages pirates and has little to no impact on legitimate users. However, I'm still of the opinion that DRM should be dropped and instead developers should reward legitimate users with lots of micro-content updates. For instance, TF2 is constantly being patched which makes pirating it more difficult. I used to pirate games because it was convenient, yet thanks to Steam I don't have any pirated games and haven't for the past 5-6yrs - that's because I no longer have to manual source patches, deal with CD-checks, have to find no-CD cracks on dodgy sites, worry about losing my CD-key or deal with installers. Purchasing games was actually less convenient that pirating just 5-10yrs ago.

Fighting piracy with DRM is counter-productive. Instead you must add value and convenience to the legitimate version, while reducing the value and convenience of the pirated version. Pirates are gonna get pretty hacked off if they need to wait a week for extra content to show up on pirate websites and then manually update the game, if such content even appears on such sites, as if they're missing something that legitimate users have access to it devalues the pirated version. I think the best analogy is to liken it to a customer buys a chilled coke with ice, where a pirate gets a warm coke that has gone flat - sure they can re-carbonate the drink and make their own ice but it's an added inconvenience; it also adds a delay.

I wholeheartedly agree with everything in the above paragraphs so I just wanted to QFT.
 
Avatar 17185
 
“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.”
- Mahatma Gandhi
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
26. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 16:21 Beamer
 
The problem with something like this is that you won't get those conversions from pirate to buyer (however rare or common they are.) Worse, you'll have really bad word of mouth and claims of bugginess dissuading real buyers as they talk on messageboards to people they don't realize are pirates.

 
-------------
Music for the discerning:
http://www.deathwishinc.com
http://www.hydrahead.com
http://www.painkillerrecords.com
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
25. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 16:05 Muscular Beaver
 
theyarecomingforyou wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 15:32:
Muscular Beaver wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 14:57:
If anyone who call himself a PC gamer doesnt know Bohemia, then they should go right back to their console and leave the PC for troll posts... Uh... yeah.
I'm sorry but titles like ArmA really aren't mainstream, just like GSC Game World. They may produce great games but it wouldn't even surprise me for a second if many to most avid PC gamers hadn't heard of either company - in both cases the games are better known than the developer.

Games are always better known than the developer. Most dont know what DICE is. But they know what BF3 is.
As I said, I am talking about PC gamers. PC gamers even know Bullfrog, Westwood, Dynamix, Sierra, Origin, etc, etc, incl. Bohemia. OFP after all sold far over 1 million copies (last I read its over 2 million now). Crysis did too. Thats not mainstream?
Ohkay...
 
Avatar 12928
 
Oh that is so lame... You will PAY for your use of inappropriate dialogue!
- Mojo Jojo
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
24. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 15:54 Verno
 
Spaced wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 15:29:
Perhaps we're talking past each other a bit then. I'm commenting on this system specifically without comparing it to past efforts. On its own, this system seems pretty unique and effective. Plus, it probably takes far fewer resources to put something like this together than it does spending the time and extreme expense of implementing one of the restrictive third party/dedicated DRM systems used traditionally.

Fair enough, I don't really agree but I'm all for publishers experimenting as that's the only way they'll find out what works and what angers people

Uh, just because you are in school does not give you the right to steal. And I didn't necessarily mean to throw every pirate in jail. No, there needs to be a selective process and developers should pool their resources together in such a targeted effort (plenty of ways to do this with prosecution options). In fact, I would suggest targeting the original hackers themselves first would be the best approach. Put the people responsible for cracking the software and distributing it in jail first, gauge the result, then determine if further legal efforts are needed among pirate consumers. Again, targeting the source first.

Right but then why aren't you in prison? Or me? Or your sister who downloaded a song/movie/whatever using some silly program. The point isn't excusing piracy, far from it. It's just to explain that not every pirate is depriving a publisher of revenue and that there isn't a way to make selective distinctions between pirates and users. They are largely the same thing. That problem has even started to manifest itself on the consoles. The companies most successful in fighting piracy have been doing it using benign DRM and product value, not anti-piracy mechanisms. There's also plenty of historical support for jailtime not putting a dent in piracy on the commercial side of things, let alone residential use. The RIAA wasn't very successful in stopping music piracy with lawsuits either for that matter. Fighting your potential consumer pool is not the road to take, however morally correct it feels. Today's pirate is tomorrows customer and the companies who have recognized that have done very well.
 
Avatar 51617
 
Playing: The Last of Us Remastered
Watching: Intruders, Coherence, The Rover
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
23. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 15:50 Quboid
 
Spaced wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 15:29:
If Quake had failed because of some apparent bug, I'd have gone back to Duke Nukem 3D.

Who takes recommendations from a pirate? All of us. Someone recommends a game, do you demand to see a receipt? How many of the comments and recommendations for on this fair site come from people who have a legal copy? All? I very, very much doubt it. Most, I hope, but not all. If someone reports that "Medal of Duty: Modern Battlefields 4" is a buggy piece of crap, do you stop to think that maybe it's a FADE type DRM and they have a pirate copy?

Why would you allow others to determine your opinion for you? And you said it yourself, many comments are made by people not using the game legally. These days the way things are, you should start from the position that you don't know who is posting at all and it is likely they are using an illegal copy of the software, have a crappy system they're lying about, and/or don't know how to properly operate their computer. Then work in from there as more information is provided to validate the claim.

Risk and cost is certainly a factor and if you don't want to take the risk or can't afford a game, don't buy the game! That's a perfectly legitimate (and -legal-) decision to make. But don't go stealing the product and then complain when your hacked apart malware infested illegal copy doesn't work right. And anyone who -expects- an illegal copy of any software program to work right is a fool and so is anyone who listens to them -assuming- they are using a legal build (and have a capable system they know how to use). Many reported game bugs are a result of pirating and sometimes developers lose weeks or months of time trying to find and fix problems that never existed in their software! The problems were -introduced- by the idiot hackers who ignorantly deleted a bunch of code. Then the developer gets blamed and their reputation harmed for the result of -piracy-, not their own legitimate work. And we're supposed to sit here and welcome the pirates, their theft, their spreading viruses and malware, the damage they do to developers, and the time wasted that developers could have spent on making their games better? No way! I say find 'em, jail 'em, and get them off our platform. Our computers will be safer, developers will earn more, and our games will be better.

Are you really claiming that you aren't influenced at all by what comments other people make? By that logic, you know nothing about anything that you haven't personally experienced. I don't believe what I'm told to believe, but if lots of people say such-and-such a film is awful, I'm not going to be in a hurry to watch that film. If lots of people say such-and-such a game is buggy, I'm not going to be in a hurry to buy that game. You can not operate any other way, you can not play every game, watch every film, listen to every song, test drive every car. You need to filter out the crap, and you do that automatically by talking about things and reading comments and criticism from people whose opinions you have a certain amount of faith in.

I asked a question on Bluesnews a few days ago about this very game, basically asking if it was any good. If someone had replied "nah, it's so buggy, I could hardly make out anything on screen", then I'd have been even less likely to buy the game.

I haven't heard anyone trying to "sit here and welcome the pirates", that's strawman nonsense. My take on it is that the developers shouldn't be contributing to making the situation even worse, which I believe BIS are doing.

This comment was edited on Nov 9, 2011, 16:23.
 
Avatar 10439
 
- Quboid
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
22. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 15:32 theyarecomingforyou
 
Muscular Beaver wrote on Nov 9, 2011, 14:57:
If anyone who call himself a PC gamer doesnt know Bohemia, then they should go right back to their console and leave the PC for troll posts... Uh... yeah.
I'm sorry but titles like ArmA really aren't mainstream, just like GSC Game World. They may produce great games but it wouldn't even surprise me for a second if many to most avid PC gamers hadn't heard of either company - in both cases the games are better known than the developer.

As for the copy protection, if you're going to implement any protection then it should be like this - something that disadvantages pirates and has little to no impact on legitimate users. However, I'm still of the opinion that DRM should be dropped and instead developers should reward legitimate users with lots of micro-content updates. For instance, TF2 is constantly being patched which makes pirating it more difficult. I used to pirate games because it was convenient, yet thanks to Steam I don't have any pirated games and haven't for the past 5-6yrs - that's because I no longer have to manual source patches, deal with CD-checks, have to find no-CD cracks on dodgy sites, worry about losing my CD-key or deal with installers. Purchasing games was actually less convenient that pirating just 5-10yrs ago.

Fighting piracy with DRM is counter-productive. Instead you must add value and convenience to the legitimate version, while reducing the value and convenience of the pirated version. Pirates are gonna get pretty hacked off if they need to wait a week for extra content to show up on pirate websites and then manually update the game, if such content even appears on such sites, as if they're missing something that legitimate users have access to it devalues the pirated version. I think the best analogy is to liken it to a customer buys a chilled coke with ice, where a pirate gets a warm coke that has gone flat - sure they can re-carbonate the drink and make their own ice but it's an added inconvenience; it also adds a delay.
 
Avatar 22891
 
SteamID: theyarecomingforyou
Star Citizen: Blue's News
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
21. Re: On Take On Helicopters DRM; Demo Plans Nov 9, 2011, 15:29 Spaced
 
As I said in my post in different words, I don't agree with your conclusion that it will only affect pirates. Maybe it is designed to do that but that doesn't mean these types of systems don't also affect legitimate users as there are several examples (FADE, Titan Quest, etc) of. The only time I've seen it pulled it off successfully was on the consoles with Spyro and that's because they could make many assumptions about the hardware platform and operating system they were working with. I think in the end the resources are better spent creating more value in the product to ensure sales or through alternative functionality like online play.

Perhaps we're talking past each other a bit then. I'm commenting on this system specifically without comparing it to past efforts. On its own, this system seems pretty unique and effective. Plus, it probably takes far fewer resources to put something like this together than it does spending the time and extreme expense of implementing one of the restrictive third party/dedicated DRM systems used traditionally. There isn't even a need for a validation server, disc check, key database system, etc, etc, for a system like this. It's simple, easy to design, user friendly, and effective. All big pluses for the developer and the legal user in my opinion.

The source of the problem is just regular people seeking out content, people pirate things for many different reasons. Not every act of piracy is necessarily depriving a developer of something, many users on this very forum pirated things in school when they didn't have disposable income and now buy everything that it's a not concern.

Throwing everyone in jail who pirated anything is just silly. In that scenario you'd probably be serving time too for crimes committed in high school like getting mp3s and whatnot.

Uh, just because you are in school does not give you the right to steal. And I didn't necessarily mean to throw every pirate in jail. No, there needs to be a selective process and developers should pool their resources together in such a targeted effort (plenty of ways to do this with prosecution options). In fact, I would suggest targeting the original hackers themselves first would be the best approach. Put the people responsible for cracking the software and distributing it in jail first, gauge the result, then determine if further legal efforts are needed among pirate consumers. Again, targeting the source first.

If Quake had failed because of some apparent bug, I'd have gone back to Duke Nukem 3D.

Who takes recommendations from a pirate? All of us. Someone recommends a game, do you demand to see a receipt? How many of the comments and recommendations for on this fair site come from people who have a legal copy? All? I very, very much doubt it. Most, I hope, but not all. If someone reports that "Medal of Duty: Modern Battlefields 4" is a buggy piece of crap, do you stop to think that maybe it's a FADE type DRM and they have a pirate copy?

Why would you allow others to determine your opinion for you? And you said it yourself, many comments are made by people not using the game legally. These days the way things are, you should start from the position that you don't know who is posting at all and it is likely they are using an illegal copy of the software, have a crappy system they're lying about, and/or don't know how to properly operate their computer. Then work in from there as more information is provided to validate the claim.

Risk and cost is certainly a factor and if you don't want to take the risk or can't afford a game, don't buy the game! That's a perfectly legitimate (and -legal-) decision to make. But don't go stealing the product and then complain when your hacked apart malware infested illegal copy doesn't work right. And anyone who -expects- an illegal copy of any software program to work right is a fool and so is anyone who listens to them -assuming- they are using a legal build (and have a capable system they know how to use). Many reported game bugs are a result of pirating and sometimes developers lose weeks or months of time trying to find and fix problems that never existed in their software! The problems were -introduced- by the idiot hackers who ignorantly deleted a bunch of code. Then the developer gets blamed and their reputation harmed for the result of -piracy-, not their own legitimate work. And we're supposed to sit here and welcome the pirates, their theft, their spreading viruses and malware, the damage they do to developers, and the time wasted that developers could have spent on making their games better? No way! I say find 'em, jail 'em, and get them off our platform. Our computers will be safer, developers will earn more, and our games will be better.
 
Reply Quote Edit Delete Report
 
60 Replies. 3 pages. Viewing page 2.
< Newer [ 1 2 3 ] Older >


footer

Blue's News logo