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Source Engine in a Browser

TojiCode shows off the source engine running in a browser using WebGL, showing a Team Fortress 2 level, though this isn't actually playable. Word is: "I stressed for a little while about fixing some of the remaining issues before posting anything (like getting water rendering) but in the end I decided that the demo serves it's purpose in that it shows that we can push a lot of geometry for a complex scene and still run at the speeds that realtime games require. Beyond that, however, I won't be able to make use of the format for any other projects and at this point I want to start working on something that is actually playable, not just looks pretty. As such, spending any further time on the format isn't practical." Thanks Ant via Slashdot.

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10. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 8, 2011, 12:26 CrimsonPaw
 
Creston wrote on Oct 8, 2011, 00:20:
What's all this jizzing in the industry over having your engine running in a browser nowadays. What's the benefit? IS there a benefit?
The benefit is for those who may use a shard PC or a public system. Say person X was out of town and wanted to do some gaming on someone else's PC (a relative or hotel), it's likely that they would be able to game quicker (no install), with more persistence (since the info is stored online), and with less of a footprint on the machine. I can see the benefit but I'm not convinced that it will turn mainstream anytime soon.
 
~~Crim~~
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9. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 8, 2011, 10:46 Animals for Crackers
 
What's all this jizzing in the industry over having your engine running in a browser nowadays. What's the benefit? IS there a benefit?

Uh, software costs money? Barrier of entry, guys!
 
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8. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 8, 2011, 10:14 MrRadicalEd
 
Please Blues, this is not the Source Engine in a browser. It was an exported TF2 map to run on WebGL. Big Difference.

I am impressed to see the amount of geometry in a browser, but we have seen a "successful" model used in Battlefield Heroes.

The future is promising especially when you have built in GPU like Sandybridge and soon to be Hanswell Intel chipsets.
 
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7. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 8, 2011, 06:22 yuastnav
 
Beamer wrote on Oct 7, 2011, 22:40:
Yeah, I can't fathom why the common comment to browser gaming here is "fuck you!"
[...]

Because it adds another unnecessary layer between the software you want to run and the hardware.
Opera and Firefox, the browsers I use (cannot comment about the others), seem to be hogging resources like mad and are quite slow.
Maybe a fresh install with only a few tabs and no add-ons works okay but if you use it more excessively it gets bad.
Why not use browser just for what browsers were initially designed for?
 
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6. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 8, 2011, 01:39 DarkCntry
 
Creston wrote on Oct 8, 2011, 00:20:
What's all this jizzing in the industry over having your engine running in a browser nowadays. What's the benefit? IS there a benefit?

Creston

There's a browser on everyone's system, and a good chance that being able to run said browser is universal...it's a pretty big incentive to developers when there's a platform that has an almost 100% customer base with little work on the end-users' side to access.
 
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5. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 8, 2011, 01:33 Creston
 
theyarecomingforyou wrote on Oct 8, 2011, 00:42:
Creston wrote on Oct 8, 2011, 00:20:
What's all this jizzing in the industry over having your engine running in a browser nowadays. What's the benefit? IS there a benefit?
A lot of people are too lazy to install games. Plus while it's loading they can spam you with ads. Win win.

Good points. Sadly.

Creston
 
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4. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 8, 2011, 00:42 theyarecomingforyou
 
Creston wrote on Oct 8, 2011, 00:20:
What's all this jizzing in the industry over having your engine running in a browser nowadays. What's the benefit? IS there a benefit?
A lot of people are too lazy to install games. Plus while it's loading they can spam you with ads. Win win.
 
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SteamID: theyarecomingforyou
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3. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 8, 2011, 00:20 Creston
 
What's all this jizzing in the industry over having your engine running in a browser nowadays. What's the benefit? IS there a benefit?

Creston
 
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2. That is NOT the Source engine. Oct 7, 2011, 22:49 I've Got The News Blues
 
The title and first sentence of this story are wrong. That is not the Source engine. It is an independently developed, WebGL-based engine which loads map files in the Source engine format. That is a big difference. Neiither Valve nor its code are involved in that project.

This comment was edited on Oct 8, 2011, 03:35.
 
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1. Re: Source Engine in a Browser Oct 7, 2011, 22:40 Beamer
 
Yeah, I can't fathom why the common comment to browser gaming here is "fuck you!"

If something can be delivered in a browser that equals something installed... so what? It isn't like every browser game by default must be Civ Facebook. We have a trimmed down UE3 in browsers. Within 3 or 4 years browser games will equal non-browser games.
 
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