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Saturday Legal Briefs

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5. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Aug 29, 2011, 05:43 xXBatmanXx
 
From the CDC:

Mortality
All homicides

* Number of deaths: 18,361
* Deaths per 100,000 population: 6.1
* Cause of death rank: 15

Firearm homicides

* Number of deaths: 12,632
* Deaths per 100,000 population: 4.2

Source: Deaths: Final Data for 2007, tables B, 18 [PDF - 555 KB]
 
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In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. / Few men have virtue enough to withstand the highest bidder.
Playing: New dad
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4. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Aug 29, 2011, 05:35 xXBatmanXx
 
jdreyer wrote on Aug 28, 2011, 04:54:
Over the past two decades, every kind of violent crime has seen a drastic decrease :

The cumulative falloff is truly remarkable: Murders slipped 7 percent last year, to 15,100—nearly 45 percent below the 1991 peak. And the declines involve nearly every category of crime, in communities big and small. Property crime last year was down 4.9 percent; robbery, 8.1 percent; and auto theft, 17.2 percent. Even struggling Detroit enjoyed a 2.4 percent drop in violent crime. For many experts, the big surprise was that crime continued to fall even as the national economy was tanking. “This is a real break in past patterns,” says criminologist Richard Rosenfeld.

This decrease corresponds directly with the rise in popularity of video games. And although correlation does not necessarily mean causation, studies are beginning to tie the two together, and with good reason. Think about it:

1. Video games suck up hours of time a day, most especially of young men who are most likely to commit crimes. In the past that time would have been spent on the streets. You're much less likely to commit a crime if you spend most of your time inside playing Halo.

2. Video games provide an outlet for violence. In the past, that would have been real violence, not virtual violence.

3. Video games can provide a cheap high. People can have their dopamine receptors pushed via Call of Duty ($60) instead of killing/robbing/stealing/whoring to get enough money for crack, blow, or smack ($600+). Granted it's not quite the same thing, but that path is a lot easier.

I stopped reading at your #1, as I drive by the basketball hoops, soccer fields, parks, and everywhere else that we used to play at, and they are empty....THIS is what is wrong with what is going on. There is no "community" until a violent crime happens. We used to have to wait 30+ minutes to get a game on the court. Been a long time since I saw more than 3-4 kids TOTAL on that court...probably more than 15 years.

Lets not even get started on the McDonalds generation, obesity, pop in schools, etc etc etc.

There is a very bad epidemic of something going on - and part of it has to do with technology, which video games fall into.

And crime rates aren't falling. The major cities are recatergorizing crimes into lesser crimes, so they don't show up in FBI stats. This is a known problem. Also, the jails and counties aren't prosecuting a lot of crimes for lack of funds. You have criminals walking the streets and continuing their crime with plea bargains to lesser crimes.

Murders are up (each state might call them something different, but if it gets charged as 'manslaughter' then it doesn't fall into the highest degree of murder, )rapes are up, assaults are up, stolen vehicles are up. I would like to see Homicide and Murder put together - probably shows a different story.

Assaults probably aren't having reports taken if there isn't someone shot. Or is recategorized as something else if they are shot. Like attempted murder. Stolen vehicles are through the roof - probably recategorized as a theft so it doesn't show up.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_the_United_States#Homicide
Violent crime

The reported US violent crime rate includes only Aggravated Assault, whereas the Canadian violent crime rate includes all categories of assault, including the much-more-numerous Assault level 1 (i.e., assault not using a weapon and not resulting in serious bodily harm).[31][32] A government study concluded that direct comparison of the 2 countries' violent crime totals or rates was "inappropriate".[43]

This comment was edited on Aug 29, 2011, 05:48.
 
Avatar 10714
 
In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. / Few men have virtue enough to withstand the highest bidder.
Playing: New dad
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3. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Aug 28, 2011, 04:54 jdreyer
 
Over the past two decades, every kind of violent crime has seen a drastic decrease :

The cumulative falloff is truly remarkable: Murders slipped 7 percent last year, to 15,100—nearly 45 percent below the 1991 peak. And the declines involve nearly every category of crime, in communities big and small. Property crime last year was down 4.9 percent; robbery, 8.1 percent; and auto theft, 17.2 percent. Even struggling Detroit enjoyed a 2.4 percent drop in violent crime. For many experts, the big surprise was that crime continued to fall even as the national economy was tanking. “This is a real break in past patterns,” says criminologist Richard Rosenfeld.

This decrease corresponds directly with the rise in popularity of video games. And although correlation does not necessarily mean causation, studies are beginning to tie the two together, and with good reason. Think about it:

1. Video games suck up hours of time a day, most especially of young men who are most likely to commit crimes. In the past that time would have been spent on the streets. You're much less likely to commit a crime if you spend most of your time inside playing Halo.

2. Video games provide an outlet for violence. In the past, that would have been real violence, not virtual violence.

3. Video games can provide a cheap high. People can have their dopamine receptors pushed via Call of Duty ($60) instead of killing/robbing/stealing/whoring to get enough money for crack, blow, or smack ($600+). Granted it's not quite the same thing, but that path is a lot easier.
 
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"It's just a bunch of mystic bovine scatology to me." - 1badmf
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2. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Aug 27, 2011, 22:53 DukeFNukem
 
To the webmaster who likes to embed his comments in the pages...

With regard to the research on the effects of video games...

It doesn't seem all that silly to me. I seem to recall a passage in the Bible that says, "An idle mind suffers hunger". Video games keep people entertained. Its the same reason community centers help cut down on crime in neighborhoods. Teenagers need something to occupy their free time and video games can do that pretty easily.
 
Just because you aren't afraid of something doesn't it mean it can't kill you...
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1. Re: Saturday Legal Briefs Aug 27, 2011, 15:44 WyldKat
 
I don't get it, they're wanting to make VPNs illegal? Do they not realize a ton of businesses use VPNs?

WTF lawmakers...
 
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