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Morning Tech Bits

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14. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 18, 2011, 10:02 Ant
 
Verno wrote on Jun 17, 2011, 11:21:
Disabling Windows Pagefile & Hibernation to Reclaim SSD Space.

People shouldn't disable their pagefile. First of all no matter how much ram you have, you can run into problems to poorly coded programs and unforeseen issues. Second SSDs are practically made for pagefile-like functions. They have very fast random access times and excel at small writes.
Ditto. I hate these softwares, especially games, that leak memory. Ugh.

For those who use Windows and have a lot of unused RAM, check this out: http://memory.dataram.com/products-and-services/software/ramdisk ... You could use your extra RAM as a RAM drive (faster than SSD). Very useful for 32-bit Windows that doesn't use all the RAM.
 
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13. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 18, 2011, 08:47 zincthallinide
 
I run Windows 7 64 with 8 GB of memory and have been running without a pagefile for months. I've had no issues, except when I gave a virtual machine too much memory and my system locked up

If you are knowledgeable enough about the operation of your computer I say disable your pagefile. If nothing else it definitely takes time to write.. whatever it wants to write, and if you have enough memory, why bother. There was a time when nobody had pagefiles or swap space
 
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12. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 18, 2011, 08:17 Dades
 
skyguy wrote on Jun 17, 2011, 21:45:
making the SSD the C: drive is whats stupid. Put slow-loading games on there, you really want a million versions of .NET filling up your ultra fast ultra expensive SSD?

That's poor, uninformed advice that has no basis in reality. Games aren't optimized for SSDs, they are optimized for streaming data from DVDs and Blurays. They are also largely CPU/GPU bottlenecked, very rarely will an SSD show a large improvement in load times because frequently the CPU is unpacking container formats and handling other tasks. There are very few games which will show a marked improvement from being on SSD, mostly just MMO games that go crazy with needing huge amounts of texture memory filled from disk constantly.

The operating system has several IO bottlenecks that an SSD makes an incredible improvement for, particularly at the application layer. It makes perfect sense to have your operating system on the SSD, its where you will see the most benefit.
 
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11. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 21:45 skyguy
 
making the SSD the C: drive is whats stupid. Put slow-loading games on there, you really want a million versions of .NET filling up your ultra fast ultra expensive SSD?  
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10. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 19:17 space captain
 
thats a really really stupid idea, giving up the swapfile for more space  
Go forth, and kill!
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9. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 17:38 Dades
 
mag wrote on Jun 17, 2011, 15:47:
Enh. Windows (even as of 7) is absolutely terrible at managing the pagefile. With 12GB of ram and the computer mostly sitting idle, it would be sitting along writing and reading to/from the pagefile. Similarly, whenever I alt-tab out of a Valve game, or minimize something memory intensive, it sends that to the pagefile too, even when I still have 5GB of ram free.

It wouldn't let me disable the pagefile, but I bumped it down to 50MB, and my computer's been much less obnoxious to use ever since.

That's usually a failing of developers who keep hammering flush commands and causing rewrites. Windows 7 also continually learns what to cache into memory by how often, what times and how long you run programs. If you think its not working correctly you might want to check the Prefetch directory to make sure things are being cached correctly. Deleting everything in there and rebooting will force Windows 7 to relearn its user caching behavior routines.

Keep in mind some applications will not page by design because the data being written is intended for the hard drive, not temporary storage like memory. You will always have some churn even with 16GB of memory and other god box specs if you use a mechanical drive as your boot drive. If you don't want to get an SSD then you might as well make a ram disk out of the extra unused memory.
 
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8. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 16:46 Shok
 
jimnms wrote on Jun 17, 2011, 15:34:
Ugh, that gives me a headache just remembering that. I remember having to go over the load order to free up a few KB to run a new game.

I mostly used QEMM for DOS memory squeezing but I do remember having a plain old bootdisk floppy for Falcon 3 lol
 
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7. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 15:47 mag
 
Enh. Windows (even as of 7) is absolutely terrible at managing the pagefile. With 12GB of ram and the computer mostly sitting idle, it would be sitting along writing and reading to/from the pagefile. Similarly, whenever I alt-tab out of a Valve game, or minimize something memory intensive, it sends that to the pagefile too, even when I still have 5GB of ram free.

It wouldn't let me disable the pagefile, but I bumped it down to 50MB, and my computer's been much less obnoxious to use ever since.
 
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6. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 15:34 jimnms
 
Those tips can apply to regular HDD's as well if you're running low on space. I always remember Windows defaulting to 1.5x your RAM, not 4x. I've always used a fixed page file at 1.5x my RAM. I also move it to my larger D: drive. I wish I could move the hibernation file, I do like to use Windows 7's hybrid sleep. I don't know why they don't combine the page file and hibernation into one file.

Up next by techgage: How to load your device drivers high to reclaim more of your 640K limit!

Ugh, that gives me a headache just remembering that. I remember having to go over the load order to free up a few KB to run a new game.
 
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5. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 13:49 wrigleyvillain
 
Also the pagefile is like 40-to-1 read/write, at least in Windows 7, so you don't need to worry about tons of unnecessary writes and the subsequent wear-and-tear.

And I tried to load my device drivers high but I couldn't stop eating Oreos.
 
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4. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 13:22 Creston
 
Bhruic wrote on Jun 17, 2011, 12:13:
While good points, it's worth noting that the article doesn't actually have him disabling the pagefile or removing it from the SSD, just not letting Windows decide the size of it, and doing it manually. Which is a very good idea.

It certainly used to be a good idea because Windows would always create your pagefile at 4x your actual physical memory size, and in the days of reasonably small harddisks, that was space that it didn't really need to be gobbling up.

Furthermore, apparently Windows fragmented that section of your HD quite badly with the pagefile, so it was better to just set it lower, so you'd have less fragmentation.

With today's HD space costing like 9 cents a GB (okay, admittedly he's talking about SSDs, but most people use those just for Boot, so there's still no reason to worry about space,) and NTFS not being as susceptible to swapfile fragmentation as FAT32 was, I'd say the worry about swapfiles is kind of outdated.

Up next by techgage: How to load your device drivers high to reclaim more of your 640K limit!

Creston
 
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3. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 12:13 Bhruic
 
While good points, it's worth noting that the article doesn't actually have him disabling the pagefile or removing it from the SSD, just not letting Windows decide the size of it, and doing it manually. Which is a very good idea.  
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2. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 12:10 xXBatmanXx
 
Verno wrote on Jun 17, 2011, 11:21:
Disabling Windows Pagefile & Hibernation to Reclaim SSD Space.

People shouldn't disable their pagefile. First of all no matter how much ram you have, you can run into problems to poorly coded programs and unforeseen issues. Second SSDs are practically made for pagefile-like functions. They have very fast random access times and excel at small writes.

+1 was coming in here to say the same thing.
 
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1. Re: Morning Tech Bits Jun 17, 2011, 11:21 Verno
 
Disabling Windows Pagefile & Hibernation to Reclaim SSD Space.

People shouldn't disable their pagefile. First of all no matter how much ram you have, you can run into problems to poorly coded programs and unforeseen issues. Second SSDs are practically made for pagefile-like functions. They have very fast random access times and excel at small writes.
 
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