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PC Gaming Alliance Interview

The PC Gaming Alliance Interview on bit-gamer.net talks with Intel's Matt Ployhar, the new president of this trade group. They discuss the organization's goals, how much it costs to be a member, DRM, and more. One answer discusses changes planned under the PCGA's new regime: "Several things actually. The biggest is setting a level of expectations. We’re in a marathon, not a sprint, and there are no instant fixes for some of the things we’d like to tackle next. PC gaming is an extremely dynamic ecosystem, and there’s a definite need to update the definitions of what a PC is, and who PC gamers are. We’ll be a lot more transparent moving forward. I believe we’ve been holding our cards a bit too closely, and frankly that doesn’t serve us or the ecosystem very well. It also seems to spool off into all sorts of speculation." Thanks Ant via Slashdot.

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36 Replies. 2 pages. Viewing page 1.
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36. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 23, 2011, 09:19 Slashman
 
Jerykk wrote on Jan 22, 2011, 22:13:
Isn't The Witcher considered an RPG?

SHHHHH! Don't burst his bubble...
 
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35. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 22:13 Jerykk
 
Isn't The Witcher considered an RPG?  
Avatar 20715
 
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34. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 11:11 JaguarUSF
 
How about we make games for everyone, and everyone will be happy? I don't like adventure games or RPGs, but that doesn't mean I don't want them to get developed or promoted. With online distribution, if there is an audience for it, it will get made. I personally don't care if the "big" publishers care about the PC as long as I can play things like The Witcher 2, SpaceChem, Breach, Starpoint Gemini, Bronze, APOX, et al.  
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33. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 10:23 Slashman
 
Dirwulf wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 23:27:
Draugr wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 22:50:
Dirwulf wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 21:53:
TurdFergasun wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 21:46:
you seem pretty eager to convince ppl of your great endeavours, although ruffling your feathers and puffing your cheast is quite an attractive quality of the human animal. i'm sure deep down inside your monetary wealth has brought you deep hapiness that would have otherwise been unattainable without selling your creative soul.

Yeah, I've definitely sold my soul by working at Blizzard...

If I recall, it was you who was saying that a devs primary is/should be concerned with the bottom line.
If you would like to use yourself/your career as an example as why that isn't the case though, I guess you're welcome to help defeat your own argument.

Which is to say (at the risk of being presumptious,) you have a job you like making games you enjoy/are proud of, and you well to do, financially speaking. So even though you're doing alright for yourself, Your not worried about job hunting for something that might pay more.

I can't stand Farmville. I do like a few beer and pretzel games, which I would call casual. All I'm pointing out is that making games is a business. Especially if you have stockholders to deal with.

Casual games are a great way to make money, especially the kind you find on Facebook that deal in microtransactions. People don't think twice about spending a few dollars here and there. 63 million + users times a few dollars each. I don't think I need to do the math for you. Of course, not all those people are buying Farmville cash, but hey, there are 20 more games like it on Facebook.

To ignore casual gamers could potentially be a bad move. That is if you want to be a billionaire. I'm sure Cliff at Positech is doing just fine. That said, I seriously doubt the PC Gaming Alliance "read between the lines" necessarily equates to them embracing casual games, but if it does, I have no problem with that.

Hardcore gamers tend to forget that they may be the loudest, but they are in the minority.

Well that's all just peachy. You know what my one major issue is with companies who want to embrace the lowest common denominator?

They don't have the balls to come out and say that's what they're about. Most of the time you hear these lame, sugar-coated speeches about how important PC gaming is and how it has so much potential because the platform is so robust yadda yadda yadda. Then that same company delivers crappy game experience after crappy game experience for the PC.

I'd rather know where I stand with a company in terms of my importance as a customer, so I can have an easier time of making an informed decision as to what games I buy.

Also, Blizzard recently released Starcraft 2. How much did that sell? I guess the average PC gamer is now irrelevant to Blizzard's bottom line in the face of WoW.

I keep hearing all this talk about how little 'hardcore' gamers matter and how making a deep and complex game is meaningless because shallow sells more. Well then what the hell are those developers still doing on this platform? Wouldn't they make more money by putting those resources into the console side of their development?

I'm also now fuzzy on what a hardcore gamer even is these days. Apparently you're hardcore if you want your games to be more than just button mashing and if you want them to not play themselves(hello Splinter Cell: Conviction). Oh, and if you want them to have interfaces and controls that don't suck on PC. You're totally hardcore if you're into that stuff.
 
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32. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 10:14 ASeven
 
Dirwulf's mentality, which is prevalent amongst mainstream developers, is the reason more and more people go indie, why Frictional Games is making quite a success despite Amnesia being very niche, the reason why indies are rising up.

I play game to have fun, not to fuel someone's pocket. I play games that were made with love, not made with the dollar in sight.

You find good games in indies, because of the mentality above you seldom find anything worthy on mainstream gaming anymore.
 
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31. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 09:24 Kajetan
 
...

This comment was edited on Jan 22, 2011, 09:40.
 
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30. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 09:23 Kajetan
 
Dirwulf wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 17:06:
Making games is a business, not a sport, or something you do for fun.
Yes, you could do that. But you don't have to. I can make a game just for the fun of it. Sure, it probably will be only a little flash game, but a game it is.

If you want to make money, you need to find the biggest audience.
Wrong. If you want to make money, choose your target group carefully, then make a game for this target group. If a specific target group is already served by a lot of other competitors, choose another genre, choose another target group. You WILL loose money, when you go where everyone already is.

That means casual games.
No. See above. But most people, who finance game developement, have no fuckin clue about the market. So they go where everyone already is. This means casual games. Not because they will get rich, but because investors are mostly greedy stupid fucks.

As a hardcore gamer, a game developer and a captalist pig, I have no problem with this.
No, of course not. Because you too have no fuckin clue ;-P
 
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29. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 08:34 Prez
 
StingingVelvet wrote on Jan 22, 2011, 08:14:
Dirwulf wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 23:27:
Hardcore gamers tend to forget that they may be the loudest, but they are in the minority.

I don't think rational hardcore gamers are confused on that point, we know that. At the same time though switching from making creative and contained works of art to making services that are designed from the ground up to make money from compulsive people, rather than be good games or artistic in any way, is basically the old "selling out" cliche.

You're obviously more focused on "how do I make money from games?" rather than "how do I make great games?" That's fine, you're probably in the majority, but as players we don't care... we want real games and people are either going to make them or they aren't. If they aren't, well, we're going to bitch about it, as anyone would do when their hobby is being weakened.

Great post. Personally, I'm proud to be focused on games as amazingly fun, interactive entertainment and potentially deep and meaningful escapism, not as a financial commodity like Dirwulf. That's what businessmen are for.
 
Avatar 17185
 
Goodbye my Monte boy. May you rest in the peace you never knew in life.
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28. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 08:14 StingingVelvet
 
Dirwulf wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 23:27:
Hardcore gamers tend to forget that they may be the loudest, but they are in the minority.

I don't think rational hardcore gamers are confused on that point, we know that. At the same time though switching from making creative and contained works of art to making services that are designed from the ground up to make money from compulsive people, rather than be good games or artistic in any way, is basically the old "selling out" cliche.

You're obviously more focused on "how do I make money from games?" rather than "how do I make great games?" That's fine, you're probably in the majority, but as players we don't care... we want real games and people are either going to make them or they aren't. If they aren't, well, we're going to bitch about it, as anyone would do when their hobby is being weakened.
 
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27. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 06:57 Nucas
 
Acleacius wrote on Jan 22, 2011, 03:06:
Nothing these guys can do for REAL PC gaming. They would have to expose m$ and their most likely illegal trade practices. m$ have continually undermined the whole gaming industry in an attempt to make a substandard platform a priority development over more sophisticated and superior PC systems.

you're talking like this is some centralized conspiracy orchestrated by one company, that's just delusional.

it all comes down to the bottom line. publishers (and most developers, i would wager) are happy with the status quo. the effort, the time and money investment with developing art assets, and so on. just the other day i read some interview of some bigwig with thq (i may even have found it here on blues) basically saying "new hardware? no thanks!" because development cost will go up. that's capitalism.

the pc is so tightly tied to the console hardware cycle, i havn't had to upgrade my video card for probably 2 years now, and i play everything maxed the fuck out. it's no one company's fault, certainly not microsoft.
 
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26. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 06:44 Prez
 
kxmode wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 18:35:
Paketep wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 17:57:
Years of the PCGA can be summed up in 3 words: blah blah blah

That's a little redundant.

This message brought to you by the Department of Redundancy Department.

Oh, this is a thread about the PCGA? Wake me up when they actually do something.
 
Avatar 17185
 
Goodbye my Monte boy. May you rest in the peace you never knew in life.
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25. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 05:26 ibm
 
What's the betting they redefine PC gaming to be closer to console gaming.  
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24. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 04:03 Donkey_Punch
 
Thread ended right after Creston's post. Nothing more needed to be said.  
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23. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 03:51 Draugr
 
Acleacius wrote on Jan 22, 2011, 03:06:
Nothing these guys can do for REAL PC gaming. They would have to expose m$ and their most likely illegal trade practices. m$ have continually undermined the whole gaming industry in an attempt to make a substandard platform a priority development over more sophisticated and superior PC systems.

And let's don't even get started on drm, console systems are the biggest piracy industry in the gaming world, no competition. Yet the PC is blamed for more, so why the industry wide lie?

I wonder who profits from PC drm? drm makers for sure...oh wonder if m$ profits by hiding the fact consoles are the biggest piracy industry?

I was hoping when he was talking about FUD and propoganda, that would be one of the things he would be talking about, but we'll see I suppose.
Or not, Time will tell.
 
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22. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 22, 2011, 03:06 Acleacius
 
Nothing these guys can do for REAL PC gaming. They would have to expose m$ and their most likely illegal trade practices. m$ have continually undermined the whole gaming industry in an attempt to make a substandard platform a priority development over more sophisticated and superior PC systems.

And let's don't even get started on drm, console systems are the biggest piracy industry in the gaming world, no competition. Yet the PC is blamed for more, so why the industry wide lie?

I wonder who profits from PC drm? drm makers for sure...oh wonder if m$ profits by hiding the fact consoles are the biggest piracy industry?
 
The people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders.That is easy.All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger.It works the same way in any country.
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21. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 21, 2011, 23:27 Dirwulf
 
Draugr wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 22:50:
Dirwulf wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 21:53:
TurdFergasun wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 21:46:
you seem pretty eager to convince ppl of your great endeavours, although ruffling your feathers and puffing your cheast is quite an attractive quality of the human animal. i'm sure deep down inside your monetary wealth has brought you deep hapiness that would have otherwise been unattainable without selling your creative soul.

Yeah, I've definitely sold my soul by working at Blizzard...

If I recall, it was you who was saying that a devs primary is/should be concerned with the bottom line.
If you would like to use yourself/your career as an example as why that isn't the case though, I guess you're welcome to help defeat your own argument.

Which is to say (at the risk of being presumptious,) you have a job you like making games you enjoy/are proud of, and you well to do, financially speaking. So even though you're doing alright for yourself, Your not worried about job hunting for something that might pay more.

I can't stand Farmville. I do like a few beer and pretzel games, which I would call casual. All I'm pointing out is that making games is a business. Especially if you have stockholders to deal with.

Casual games are a great way to make money, especially the kind you find on Facebook that deal in microtransactions. People don't think twice about spending a few dollars here and there. 63 million + users times a few dollars each. I don't think I need to do the math for you. Of course, not all those people are buying Farmville cash, but hey, there are 20 more games like it on Facebook.

To ignore casual gamers could potentially be a bad move. That is if you want to be a billionaire. I'm sure Cliff at Positech is doing just fine. That said, I seriously doubt the PC Gaming Alliance "read between the lines" necessarily equates to them embracing casual games, but if it does, I have no problem with that.

Hardcore gamers tend to forget that they may be the loudest, but they are in the minority.
 
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20. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 21, 2011, 23:14 Dirwulf
 
Beamer wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 22:29:
Kudos to Jeff for outting himself (although his name was in his profile and googling him led to his IMDB page.) Many of us aren't willing to do so if we don't have authority and/or aren't our own boss.


Any chance you know David Wang? He's a producer at Blizzard that helped me get an brand manager interview a ways back but I'd already accepted another job by the time it came through.

You said Wang...huhhuh...uhh...huh...

I have nothing to hide, except what my NDA says I can't

BTW, I've outed myself in the past.
 
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19. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 21, 2011, 23:06 space captain
 
Verno wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 18:44:
A big start for these guys would be doing anything at all other than press jerkoff sessions.

spoken like a true jerkoff
 
Go forth, and kill!
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18. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 21, 2011, 22:50 Draugr
 
Dirwulf wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 21:53:
TurdFergasun wrote on Jan 21, 2011, 21:46:
you seem pretty eager to convince ppl of your great endeavours, although ruffling your feathers and puffing your cheast is quite an attractive quality of the human animal. i'm sure deep down inside your monetary wealth has brought you deep hapiness that would have otherwise been unattainable without selling your creative soul.

Yeah, I've definitely sold my soul by working at Blizzard...

If I recall, it was you who was saying that a devs primary is/should be concerned with the bottom line.
If you would like to use yourself/your career as an example as why that isn't the case though, I guess you're welcome to help defeat your own argument.

Which is to say (at the risk of being presumptious,) you have a job you like making games you enjoy/are proud of, and you well to do, financially speaking. So even though you're doing alright for yourself, Your not worried about job hunting for something that might pay more.

This comment was edited on Jan 21, 2011, 23:14.
 
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17. Re: PC Gaming Alliance Interview Jan 21, 2011, 22:29 Beamer
 
Kudos to Jeff for outting himself (although his name was in his profile and googling him led to his IMDB page.) Many of us aren't willing to do so if we don't have authority and/or aren't our own boss.


Any chance you know David Wang? He's a producer at Blizzard that helped me get an brand manager interview a ways back but I'd already accepted another job by the time it came through.
 
-------------
Music for the discerning:
http://www.deathwishinc.com
http://www.hydrahead.com
http://www.painkillerrecords.com
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