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On StarCraft II in Korea

The StarCraft 2 Uber-Interview on Games On Net talks about the real-time strategy sequel with Blizzard's Bob Colayco and Chris Davey. One of their main concerns is the amount of money spent on marketing StarCraft II in Korea, and how the game's sales compare to the original StarCraft, which is an institution in that territory. While they continue to cultivate the game in the Korean market, there is an admission that it's been slower going than anticipated. "Yeah, it's fair to say that it didn't come out of the gates as well as we'd hoped," Colayco tells them. "But we're working on some things, such as the GSL with our partner GomTV, and some other initiatives to try and continue. There's definitely a lot of interest there, we're definitely in the top 10 as far as the played games in the IGR's and we're seeing some upward mobility there so we're doing what we can to prop that up."

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14. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 29, 2010, 17:51 Yifes
 
And the lack of LAN support means that you can only play SC2 on Blizzard's terms. Both things have had a big impact.

Bullshit. Korea's PC Bangs are dominated by MMO games, which have no LAN support at all. LAN is a non-issue for Korean gamers. SC2 has been an enormous success in NA and Europe, despite the lack of LAN support and BNET 2.0, and the competitive SC2 scene outside of Korea has completely eclipsed the competitive SC1 scene. The question is why has SC2 not reached the same level of success in Korea, and the answer is that Korea's RTS scene is still dominated by SC1's better (for now) gameplay.

The truth of the matter is that SK's scene wouldn't be the same without KeSPA. Blizzard may not be trying to strictly destroy competitive SC1, but they're certainly saying "our way or the highway". They won't mind destroying all the scene if they're not the ones controlling it.

The pro SC1 scene was around for years before KeSPA swooped in to create the player abusing draconian system that it is today. KeSPA wouldn't have a scene at all if Blizzard didn't make SC, so stop trying to pull that "THEY OWE IT ALL TO KESPA" garbage. The fact of the matter is that KeSPA is every bit as stubborn as Blizzard. KeSPA would rather let the pro-SC1 scene burn than to relinquish any bit of control to Blizzard. They are every bit as guilty as Blizzard for putting their own interest ahead of the fans.


I hope they keep playing SC and not SC2 in Korea. SC2 and BNET 2.0 (which is the real thing they're selling) are poisoned fruit.

This is just pure selfishness. The SC1 scene has been stagnant for years, with no growth in viewership. Esports needs to evolve beyond SC1 or it'll die a slow painful death into obscurity. Top SC1 players like Jaedong have seen that SC2 is the future, and have stated that they will one day join the likes of Boxer, July, and Nada in SC2.

This comment was edited on Nov 29, 2010, 19:47.
 
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13. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 28, 2010, 19:53 Paketep
 
Yifes wrote on Nov 28, 2010, 17:39:
3. The relative lack of success of Starcraft 2 is not due to lack of LAN support, or the shitty-ness of BNET 2.0. Considering that Korea has ubiquitous broadband access, and most gamers play in internet cafes anyways, LAN is a non-issue

Wrong. BNET 2.0 is an enormous POS even with quality broadband. And the lack of LAN support means that you can only play SC2 on Blizzard's terms. Both things have had a big impact.

Yifes wrote on Nov 28, 2010, 17:39:
4. Blizzard is not trying to destroy competitive SC1. Whats going on is not about money, but control of the IP. KeSPA feels that they created the competitive SC1 scene, and therefore should have ownership of it, which doesn't sit well with Blizzard. Its a pissing contest between two companies, and KeSPA is hardly the victim here.

The truth of the matter is that SK's scene wouldn't be the same without KeSPA. Blizzard may not be trying to strictly destroy competitive SC1, but they're certainly saying "our way or the highway". They won't mind destroying all the scene if they're not the ones controlling it.

I agree with previous posters. Blizzard has left a lot of ethics and integrity behind since the Activision merger. They certainly don't care about us gamers and what we want anymore. The priority has stopped being making great games and is now just get more money and more personal data any way they can.

I hope they keep playing SC and not SC2 in Korea. SC2 and BNET 2.0 (which is the real thing they're selling) are poisoned fruit.
 
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12. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 28, 2010, 17:53 Kosumo
 
Thanks Yifes

So do you know of (any idea about) why it got so big in South Korea?

I did find a WIkipedia page about there pro gaming - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/StarCraft:_Brood_War_professional_competition

At some level, what I'm saying is that it's more like American Gladator than Slam Dunk NBA
 
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11. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 28, 2010, 17:39 Yifes
 
Kosumo wrote on Nov 28, 2010, 15:21:
I think that there is truth to it. I also believe that all the talk of the "PRO" gaming scene in Korea is over stated too. So they had tournaments broadcast live on TV ..... have you seen some of the other programs broadcast on Asian channels? Being broadcast on TV does not make you the NFL.

1. Starcraft is not merely "broadcast on TV". There are 2 channels who's main programming is Starcraft, OnGameNet and MBCGame, and finals fill stadiums with tens of thousands of people in attendance.

2. That $1million figure is BS. Even the most popular pro gamer in history, Slayers_Boxer, only made ~$300K a year at the height of his success. Meanwhile, if you're a lower tier player, you'd be barely scraping by at below minimum wages.

3. The relative lack of success of Starcraft 2 is not due to lack of LAN support, or the shitty-ness of BNET 2.0. Considering that Korea has ubiquitous broadband access, and most gamers play in internet cafes anyways, LAN is a non-issue. The fact is Starcraft is the gold standard for RTS games in Korea, and no other RTS has ever come close to dethroning it. Starcraft 1 has 12 years of polish and 1 expansion advantage on SC2, and as it stands right now, it is simply the better game. However, SC2 is getting more popular, as its pro-scene takes off and more and more famous SC 1 players are making the transition.

4. Blizzard is not trying to destroy competitive SC1. Whats going on is not about money, but control of the IP. KeSPA feels that they created the competitive SC1 scene, and therefore should have ownership of it, which doesn't sit well with Blizzard. Its a pissing contest between two companies, and KeSPA is hardly the victim here.

This comment was edited on Nov 28, 2010, 17:53.
 
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10. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 28, 2010, 15:21 Kosumo
 
I read it somewhere (or seen it on TV).

I think that there is truth to it. I also believe that all the talk of the "PRO" gaming scene in Korea is over stated too. So they had tournaments broadcast live on TV ..... have you seen some of the other programs broadcast on Asian channels? Being broadcast on TV does not make you the NFL.

A few months back, someone here was saying now the players make millions of dollars, well, looking over the whole of the (english part) of the internet, I stuggled to find any evideance of that.

It's like saying that since there are Pro dart players and a TV league in England, that the whole of England is Darts crazy.

One Hundred and Eighty!

imho
 
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9. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 28, 2010, 13:36 psulli
 
Kosumo wrote on Nov 27, 2010, 17:30:
Or the first Startcraft sucsesse in Korea was maybe due to other factors .... like high unemployment at the time and many Koreans spending their time in internet cafes looking for work which leads to them fulling their spare time playing starcraft.

I have never heard or read that. Is that a personal theory, because it sounds like it would be a great article.
 
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8. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 28, 2010, 02:42 Flatline
 
Kosumo wrote on Nov 27, 2010, 17:30:
Or the first Startcraft sucsesse in Korea was maybe due to other factors .... like high unemployment at the time and many Koreans spending their time in internet cafes looking for work which leads to them fulling their spare time playing starcraft.

I'd also say that SC2 changed how it plays slightly yet fundamentally. People train 10 hours a day to play starcraft professionally for years at a time. Moving to SC2 would require starting over again from scratch. You're going to encounter resistance in the professional circuit when you change things up like that. I'm just conjecturing here but it seems reasonable.

Plus, Battle.net 2 sucks turdballs. Blizzard should have been happy just selling 2 copies to every man, woman, and child in South Korea. I get the feeling they wanted a slice of the pro circuit pie and so made a lot of basic changes that... well... sucked.

Blizzard isn't the company it was even back when it launched World of Warcraft. The Activision merger changed the corporate culture of Blizzard somewhat it seems like.
 
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7. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 27, 2010, 23:10 Cutter
 
The Koran Market? I'd guess that SC wouldn't go over to big with muslims. LOL

 
Avatar 25394
 
"The South will boogie again!" - Disco Stu
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6. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 27, 2010, 17:30 Kosumo
 
Or the first Startcraft sucsesse in Korea was maybe due to other factors .... like high unemployment at the time and many Koreans spending their time in internet cafes looking for work which leads to them fulling their spare time playing starcraft.  
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5. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 27, 2010, 16:47 Vulkan
 
Perhaps the difference in system requirements enter into it as well.  
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4. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 27, 2010, 16:45 shinchan0s
 
Nice. They developed the game to cater to the Korean market and it bites them in the butt. Thanks for ruining a top-notch franchise. GG.  
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3. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 27, 2010, 16:35 Kobalt
 
This has everything to do with blizzard trying their best to fuck up the competitive scene for some reason. They got way too greedy with this shit.  
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2. removed Nov 27, 2010, 15:45 Icewind
 
* REMOVED *
This comment was deleted on Nov 28, 2010, 13:43.
 
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1. Re: On StarCraft II in Korea Nov 27, 2010, 14:28 RenownWolf
 
Wonder if it has anything to do with Battle.net 2.0? No lan play? and all the suing going on.

Maybe people just aren't interested?

Even a lot of the custom map guys are not impressed with the b.net stuff. I think they were hoping for a better community setup, and chat rooms.
 
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http://www.renownwolf.com
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