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More Valve Mac Clues

Valve sends along a batch of images that are another indication that they are thinking different, and planning additional support for Macintosh systems, following the recent discovery of OS X images in the new Steam beta client. These images include a "Steam for the rest of us" ad, a shot of the iHEV suit, a Heavy iTunes homage, Alyx Vance in the 1984 ad, and more.

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11. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 4, 2010, 17:42 Kxmode
 
And you'll see why 2010 won't be like "2010."  
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10. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 21:28 |RaptoR|
 
WaltC wrote on Mar 3, 2010, 19:12:
Really, the concept is sort of bizarre as OS X now includes a standard utility that allows any Mac user to install Windows 7 (or Vista or XP) and run it natively on a Mac--it's called Bootcamp. Since today's Macs literally are standard Intel "PCs" running an x86 version of OS X, running Windows 7 on today's Mac is a perfectly normal expectation and event. It's ironic to think that for today's x86 Macs Windows is actually a whole hell of a lot more compatible than Apple's Classic PPC OS of yesterday--which probably won't run on an x86 Mac at all, except *maybe* through a VM, and then not very well at all.

Anybody who has bought an x86 Mac in the last few of *years* can install Windows and run it natively, already, and so Steam is already available to them. Seems like somewhat of a waste of time and resources for Valve to develop for OS X since because Apple has tied OS X exclusively to Mac hardware the OS X market is always going to be teeny-tiny compared to the Windows market, a market which serves the open international x86 hardware markets--and Windows is as much at home on today's Mac as is OS X.

The minute that Apple transitioned the Mac to Intel x86 the "difference" between a "mac" and a "pc" simply ceased to be from a hardware perspective. That's what makes Apple's continuing "I'm a Mac--He's a PC" ads so silly--because they are *all* "PCs" now...;) The major only hardware difference between "Macs" and "PCs'" these days
is that Macs are restricted to Intel cpus and core logic, whereas all other PC makers can offer you your choice of Intel or AMD cpus and core logic hardware.

For me, the superiority has always come from the operating system and the accessibility it provides. Apple has always lagged behind in hardware, short of standards adoption. They pioneered Firewire and USB, and recently have brought Displayport to the forefront.

I never bought into the PowerPC lie. It may be a better architecture on paper but that never translated to tangible benefits. The only thing setting it apart was AltiVec, and that gap was closed with SSE.

It's the workflow of the operating system that is the biggest difference. The ease of use and stability are huge factors. I am an IT professional... just because I know how to troubleshoot a system and fix drivers, poorly written software, and buggy browsers doesn't mean I want to... especially on my free time. Plugging devices in and having them integrate seamlessly into the "experience" means a lot to me.

As I've moved more into development, I've come to appreciate the SDK. You are given, for free, a world class set of tools with which to write software. Instruments is INCREDIBLE. Xcode is great, and Apples documentation is next to none. Cocoa and Objective-C are much more elegant and understandable than the .NET clusterfuck in my eyes. To each his own... the benefit of such an elegant development environment is overshadowed by having a smaller market to deliver software to.

There's been a lot of buzz recently about Apples progress on fully supporting OpenGL 3.0 (http://www.macrumors.com/2010/01/12/apple-progressing-toward-full-support-for-opengl-3-0-in-mac-os-x-10-6-3/) and I can't help but think Apple has been working behind the scenes quite a bit since hiring Graeme Devine as their gaming evangelist for the iPhone and OS X platforms. Getting Valves support is huge!

But I digress -- to the point of the thread:

Running Windows on a Mac through bootcamp is disruptive -- you have to close out of any apps you have running, reboot (and for an OS X user, that isn't a common thing) and boot into Windows, play your game, then return to OS X in similar fashion. Most bootcamp installs are simply shells for a single purpose... typically games. Anyone using bootcamp for a legacy application is better off with VMWare Fusion or Parallels.

But my point is that bootcamp is a pain in the ass.

Not to mention to do it legitimately requires a Windows license.

Having a native client means you can play games at your leisure without having to disrupt any other activity, integrate it with your daily routine and not have to close out 30 project windows when you need a short breather to mow down some Zombies.

This isn't hurting anyone, and it will certainly serve only to further both platforms in my eyes.
 
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9. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 19:30 nin
 

Not much of a rumor anymore...I've always said my steam account was one of few things typing me to a PC. Of course, getting the client and getting a large number of games running under mac are separate things, but I still look forward to the news.

 
http://www.nin.com/pub/tension/
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8. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 19:12 WaltC
 
Really, the concept is sort of bizarre as OS X now includes a standard utility that allows any Mac user to install Windows 7 (or Vista or XP) and run it natively on a Mac--it's called Bootcamp. Since today's Macs literally are standard Intel "PCs" running an x86 version of OS X, running Windows 7 on today's Mac is a perfectly normal expectation and event. It's ironic to think that for today's x86 Macs Windows is actually a whole hell of a lot more compatible than Apple's Classic PPC OS of yesterday--which probably won't run on an x86 Mac at all, except *maybe* through a VM, and then not very well at all.

Anybody who has bought an x86 Mac in the last few of *years* can install Windows and run it natively, already, and so Steam is already available to them. Seems like somewhat of a waste of time and resources for Valve to develop for OS X since because Apple has tied OS X exclusively to Mac hardware the OS X market is always going to be teeny-tiny compared to the Windows market, a market which serves the open international x86 hardware markets--and Windows is as much at home on today's Mac as is OS X.

The minute that Apple transitioned the Mac to Intel x86 the "difference" between a "mac" and a "pc" simply ceased to be from a hardware perspective. That's what makes Apple's continuing "I'm a Mac--He's a PC" ads so silly--because they are *all* "PCs" now...;) The major only hardware difference between "Macs" and "PCs'" these days
is that Macs are restricted to Intel cpus and core logic, whereas all other PC makers can offer you your choice of Intel or AMD cpus and core logic hardware.
 
Avatar 16008
 
It is well known that I do not make mistakes--so if you should happen across a mistake in anything I have written, be assured that I did not write it!
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7. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 19:10 PHJF
 
Does OSX Steam come with a built-in function to quickly switch between games and WIP screenplays?  
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Steam + PSN: PHJF
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6. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 19:02 MattyC
 
Very interesting. I would love a Steam client for OS X. Neat teaser art too. Is that all really from Valve?  
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5. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 18:59 |RaptoR|
 
L4D is coming, so welcome to 2008. And if L4D2 is coming, welcome to 2009. TF2 is still played. Source engine being ported also means it is a short putt to bring CS:Source to the platform as well.

Maybe it is welcome to 1999, but 1999 is alive and well in 2010.
 
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4. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 18:58 |RaptoR|
 
This is AWESOME.
 
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3. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 18:44 Wildone
 
Those images mean nothing, its not gonna look any better on a MAC.
They're playing catch up. Welcome to 1999.
 
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2. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 18:15 raVen
 
I think they'll do quite well and this might actually be the tip of the iceburg that the mac community (devs and gamers) have needed.

If the OSX platform is viable and steam monthly hardware reports start showing how many macs use steam we could actually see much more dev support getting behind cross platform development. I think it's a great idea, who knows it might eventually lead to a Linux client too -- either way being restricted to windows sucks. I prefer PC input for most gameplay types.
 
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1. Re: More Valve Mac Clues Mar 3, 2010, 18:11 Coolone
 
Not a Mac fan myself, but I must admit, those pics look pretty cool.  
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