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User information for Droniac

Real Name Droniac   
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Nickname None given.
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Homepage http://gamedrone.net
Signed On May 12, 2011, 07:42
Total Comments 8 (Suspect)
User ID 56657
 
User comment history
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News Comments > Unreal Tournament Pre-Alpha
13. Re: Unreal Tournament Pre-Alpha Aug 20, 2014, 10:14 Droniac
 
Reckless wrote on Aug 19, 2014, 19:04:
UT is from a bygone era and should be left as such.

Ah yes, the bygone era of competently executed shooters. Much better to stay mired in today's muck of total inferiority.

Bring on Call of Destiny: Serious Slaughterfield ManFace Ultimate Rip-off Edition I say! + season pass plz.
 
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News Comments > CD Projekt RED Roadmap
26. Re: CD Projekt RED Roadmap Mar 22, 2013, 07:50 Droniac
 
Slick wrote on Mar 22, 2013, 02:00:
you can't be seriously trying to debate me on this? can you???

name me one PC gamer who's never heard of torrentz, let alone doesn't pirate most of their games. now name me one Console gamer that even understands how it would be possible to pirate a game for the PS3...

logic much? i don't have to listen to wtf a publisher says, i know from my own eyes and ears that %90 of the PC gamers i know pirate their stuff, while i know of exactly 1 console gamer who has a modded xbox 360.

lol, i guess i'm just a shill for the publishing companies though right? and unable to make my own conclusions with my own judgement from my own personal experience...

*ROLLEYES*

There are tens of millions of PC gamers who have never heard of torrents. Many people play Facebook games, web games, solitaire, The Sims, MMOs, etc.

Also, while this should have been covered in elementary school, you should know that your "logic" is based on the most stupid kind of fallacious reasoning. You're taking your own, small, marginal, experience to be the reality for the entire industry.

Face reality kid: your personal experience is not even a blip of a blip of a blip of a blip of a blip of a blip of a blip on the radar of the piracy situation for the games industry. And that's not exclusive to you: it's true for every individual, including myself. My, entirely opposite to your, personal experience is equally invalid when it comes to describing the full picture.

The knowledge that personal experience counts for absolutely nothing in arguments like these is such a basic fact of reasoning that to have you shouting "LOGIC" is the most hilarious thing I've seen in quite a while. It's almost as bad as the CoD kiddies whining at (a completely correct) TotalBiscuit on Twitter yesterday, proclaiming their "godlike intelligence" and then proceeding to not understand that their saying "you're entitled to head-butt a knife" actually qualifies as a death-threat.
 
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News Comments > Ad Says Guild Wars 2 Next Month
23. Re: Ad Says Guild Wars 2 Next Month May 16, 2012, 03:55 Droniac
 
PropheT wrote on May 16, 2012, 00:44:
The magic release day patch, ah yes. It's a mythical creature commonly mentioned on message boards leading up to the release date of a game that's clearly not done yet. "Don't you realize we're just testing an outdated version?!?" is my personal favorite version of this.

In general I'd agree with this. With ArenaNet, I'm not so sure. They're the one company I can recall who did implement a miracle patch between final beta weekend event and release for the original Guild Wars. Granted, some of the chances weren't positive (skill purchases for PvP), but they changed A LOT and had way more content than could've been expected based on the public beta weekends.

That being said, Guild Wars didn't really even need a miracle patch in the first place. Even the original open alpha event was very playable and solid. Guild Wars 2 on the other hand clearly still needs a fair bit of work, particularly in terms of performance. I'd be surprised if they release it in June. August or September would seem more likely as earliest estimates.

It's also important to note that ArenaNet started Guild Wars beta weekend events some 7-8 months prior to the game's eventual release. Guild Wars 2 only had its first beta weekend a couple of weeks ago. So if their Guild Wars development process is anything to go by, then we've certainly still got some waiting to do.
 
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News Comments > Sword of the Stars II Launch Issues
24. Re: Sword of the Stars II Launch Issues Oct 31, 2011, 18:37 Droniac
 
They released a massive patch today that fixed the most critical issues. The game now starts properly in 64-bit Windows and the most common crashes have been eliminated. I just played 3 hours straight without a single crash.

They still NEED to fix the sluggish interface, the inaccessible options menu, the sound cutting out randomly, and the lack of tooltips (which has now been partially remedied) but otherwise it's playable and almost enjoyable. The sluggish interface makes things unbearably slow, but there seems to be a good game here.
 
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News Comments > Might & Magic Heroes VI Beta This Month
12. Re: Might & Magic Heroes VI Beta This Month Jun 3, 2011, 05:47 Droniac
 
It's a given that M&M:H VI will not have always-online DRM. As far as I know UbiSoft has now dropped that system completely and the last game to use it was Prince of Persia: The Forgotten Sands.

The DRM employed in their most recent PC games:
R.U.S.E. - Steamworks DRM
Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood - 1 time online activation on install

So it's likely to be one of those two systems.
 
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News Comments > Capcom DRM Follow-up
30. Re: Capcom DRM Follow-up May 27, 2011, 11:32 Droniac
 
There seems to be a lot of supposition that the pirates will instantly crack whatever protections we put in place. One never knows, that could well be true. Personally, I'm not quite as defeatist. One at least has to try.

He should have replaced defeatist with realistic.

One can try, but will almost certainly fail to stop game piracy with DRM. I can only think of two DRM implementations that effectively secured their respective games for longer than a week. Those are BioShock's SecuROM and the first few games using UPlay. Both implementations gathered a great deal of flack from the PC community and likely those games lost far more sales from such harsh DRM implementations than they 'gained' from stopping day one piracy.

What irks me about this emphasis on day-one piracy is that such a matter really isn't vital to the PC games industry. Most sales for PC games do not occur until after the first month, when sales start to pick up (if it's a good game and getting reasonable positive reviews / word-of-mouth). This is a fact that has been demonstrated time and time again with every single successful PC game to date... and it directly contradicts the use of strict DRM measures aimed at day-one piracy. In the short-term such measures might gain a few additional sales during the first week, if you're successful at combating day-one piracy, which almost every DRM system is not. In the long-term such measures hurt your sales due to overwhelmingly negative feedback that actively discourages users from buying your games in the period when they're most profitable: after the first month of release.

The fact that PC games ramp up in sales after the initial weeks is well documented and can be illustrated with virtually every successful PC game. That includes Crysis, Unreal Tournament series, StarCraft series, Dawn of War series, Half Life series, Company of Heroes, The Orange Box, Left 4 Dead, The Witcher, Guild Wars, World of WarCraft, Titan Quest, Sacred, Team Fortress 2, Recettear, F.E.A.R., MineCraft, The Sims, and so on. All of these games shifted far more copies in subsequent months than the first few weeks. For reference you can look up Crysis and UT3 for instance, which went from 30K in 2 weeks to 1+ million in 3 months.

I understand that publishers want to secure their investments and that securing the product is the most obvious, but not very effective, solution. In the short-term it might increase revenue very slightly, although that's never been proven, but in the long-term harsh DRM systems always hurt sales, especially during the most profitable period of a successful PC game. It's much better to stick to CD-key checks to prevent mass-consumer piracy, and active checking for multiplayer only. Those systems are proven to work and aren't particularly intrusive for the paying customer.

I'll still buy a game if it's of good quality and merely suffers from restrictive DRM, but quite a few PC gamers I know won't (they won't pirate it either, a game pirate is not a PC gamer in my book). I have Settlers 7, Assassin's Creed 2, Splinter Cell: Conviction, BioShock, and Anno 1404. I love those games, but their respective DRM implementations are inexcusable and testify of utterly atrocious customer service. The DRM also prevents me from recommending those games to my friends, because many of them refuse to purchase such half-functional products.

The worst thing is that such restrictive DRM systems have only ever proven to not work. Harsh DRM does not prevent piracy in the slightest, at best - in a few rare cases - it marginally postpones piracy. Harsh DRM also does not appear to increase sales figures, all such games have shown relatively disappointing PC sales figures, presumably due to the massive consumer backlash against strict DRM. As such there's no actual reason to implement such measures beyond satisfying ill-informed shareholders.

Note that I don't claim a lack of strict DRM will attract any pirates to start purchasing games. Instead it will attract the fence-sitters who would otherwise spend their money on other games that don't actively punish the paying customer. Most PC game pirates are habitual liars who will realistically never spend money on a PC game in their life unless it's strictly necessary for multiplayer access. They'll claim the contrary all the way to their grave, but that doesn't make it any less a lie. There's no hope for these individuals and they shouldn't be counted as lost sales, because even if piracy were to be made completely impossible most of them still wouldn't spend money on games. Or at least that's the impression I've been left with after interacting with the several hundreds of PC game pirates I've met over the years.
 
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News Comments > The Witcher 2 DLC Will Be Free, Combat Trailer
21. Re: The Witcher 2 DLC Will Be Free, Combat Trailer May 14, 2011, 04:13 Droniac
 
El Pit wrote on May 14, 2011, 02:08:
Sure will, if you offer to pay me back the 13 Euro difference.

CD Projekt sort of already does that. The GOG.com version comes with a free RPG from the GOG.com selection as well as $16 store credit for EU customers, which lets you get two more good old games. On top of that it's DRM-free, comes with the 200 page artbook from the Collector's Edition, and includes a few of those standard GOG.com bonus items.

I understand if you aren't able to pay that much, but if you can scrape together enough funds then this is definitely the best version. You get four great games for the same price (here in The Netherlands at least) that they charge for the inferior version that contains just one game in stores, the GOG version is worth it for that alone. Obviously it costs a little less in foreign web shops, but even then I'd say that even just the three additional games make up for that marginal price difference.

This comment was edited on May 14, 2011, 04:45.
 
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News Comments > The Witcher 2 Preloads
8. Re: The Witcher 2 Preloads May 12, 2011, 03:55 Droniac
 
NKD wrote on May 12, 2011, 01:48:
And by generous you mean purchase at a 10% discount.

That 10% discount brings it on par with retail prices, so it's not much of a discount.

Besides, if you pre-order the GOG.com version then you could still call it being generous: all of the proceeds go straight to CD Projekt. That compared to some 5-10% of retail sales (outside of Poland) and probably 20-30% of digital sales on other sites.
 
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8 Comments. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
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