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Real Name I've Got The News Blues   
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Signed On Dec 26, 2009, 02:06
Total Comments 326 (Amateur)
User ID 55423
 
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News Comments > NVIDIA Responds to ATI PhysX Comments
17. Re: NVIDIA Responds to ATI PhysX Comments Mar 13, 2010, 00:09 I've Got The News Blues
 
ramerco wrote on Mar 12, 2010, 23:46:
To the point that PhysX is shit
PhysX is shit because it runs like shit on anything but Nvidia's higher-end graphics cards. Yes, PhysX can run on the CPU, but it is so damn slow that it is unusable.

Anyone who has played the official PhysX pack for UT3 or the game Warmonger knows that the potential for accelerated physics in games is great. However, so long as PhysX runs like crap on anything but higher-end Nvidia cards and Nvidia doesn't even allow its cards to be used alongside AMD/ATI cards in the same PC, PhysX will die out just like Glide did.

Unless Nvidia opens up PhysX then Microsoft's DirectCompute will be the winner of the GPU physics API wars.
 
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News Comments > OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games
81. Re: OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games Mar 11, 2010, 15:09 I've Got The News Blues
 
Anonymous Rex wrote on Mar 11, 2010, 07:05:
For reference, this is the same world that paid Zynga 80 million bucks last year for virtual items in crappy flash games.
You're comparing apples to oranges. Zynga claims to have 60 million active users per day. So, even if it made 80 million last year from microtransactions, that's not much money per user even if that 60 million were the total number of users in the year instead of just on one day. Those Zynga users are not spending $15 per month on games and certainly not spending $15 per month in addition to spending $30 - $60 initially for a game. They are using Zynga because it is free or close to it.

The casual crowd is not going to embrace OnLive because they don't need to spend $15 a month to play the games they want. There are plenty of free or cheap and immediate options already available for them. And, the hardcore and mainstream gaming crowds aren't going to pay $15 a month for the service because it has too many limitations and cost more compared to what they have right now.

The only way OnLive could succeed is if the game publishers and developers forced it upon consumers by pulling support for the current platforms and releasing future games strictly on OnLive. However that will not happen if the system doesn't work well from a technological perspective.

This comment was edited on Mar 12, 2010, 09:03.
 
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News Comments > EA Server Outage
33. Re: EA Server Outage Mar 11, 2010, 14:53 I've Got The News Blues
 
Zardoz5 wrote on Mar 11, 2010, 12:07:
Why do you say that they can't pull online support for a game if they used GameSpy tech for it? I recall the ToS in all other BF games stating they can pull the plug after giving 30 days of notice.
EA can't pull the plug on the Gamespy-run games. Gamespy would have to do it, and to my knowledge it has never done that for any game except for one which the publisher didn't pay for the contract at the release of the game.

EA has terminated the support of every older multiplayer game for the PC it has ever released for which it controlled the network infrastructure. The only older EA games which still have Internet multiplayer support are the ones runs by Gamespy such as Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2, MOH:AA (and its expansions), BF1942, BF:V, BF2, and C&C: Renegade. All of these games would be dead by now except for BF2 were it not for Gamespy.
 
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News Comments > EA Server Outage
32. Re: EA Server Outage Mar 11, 2010, 14:39 I've Got The News Blues
 
Verno wrote on Mar 11, 2010, 12:47:
Based on my experience with previous Battlefield titles and other Gamespy enabled games like Borderlands, Gamespy doesn't really know what it's doing either to be blunt.
You don't have much experience with Gamespy then because historically its reliability is head-and-shoulders above what EA and Ubisoft are offering now. Plus Gamespy's system is more robust and segregated with the authentication and master list servers separate. And, it is a fail-open system which means that if authentication fails, users can still get a list of servers and connect and play on the game servers. So, online play doesn't come to a standstill because a user can't login or their CD key can be validated.

Gamespy has powered a lot of games over the years (including ones that are over a decade old and still supported for online play) and has done a great job at it especially compared to what we are seeing now from the likes of EA and Ubisoft.
 
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News Comments > OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games
73. Re: OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games Mar 11, 2010, 10:41 I've Got The News Blues
 
space captain wrote on Mar 11, 2010, 00:55:
how does the service aspect make it a wet dream?
It gives total control over the content since the customer never has it. The publisher can dictate if the game runs, for how long, and what price must be paid to keep it running. And piracy, sharing, and resale are impossible with this service. Finally it could also eliminate the console/format wars since the same game could be streamed to any platform, i.e. develop one game for all targets. That is what makes it a content provider's wet dream.

If OnLive catches on, publishers could use it for exclusives to the detriment of not only traditional/"real" PC gaming but consoles as well.
 
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News Comments > Colin McRae DiRT 2 Patches
7. Re: Colin McRae DiRT 2 Patches Mar 11, 2010, 10:32 I've Got The News Blues
 
HoSpanky wrote on Mar 11, 2010, 08:55:
I do have the steam version, it was $20.
It's twice that price on Steam now and has been for months aside from one weekend sale. Gogamer has Dirt 2 for $25 regular price. It was $10.90 on sale, but stock ran out.

Also, backing it down to an older version means you can't play it online, making that a rather pointless thing to do.
The single-player mode isn't pointless. Career mode is one of the highlights of the game. Not everyone only plays online.

This comment was edited on Mar 11, 2010, 10:52.
 
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News Comments > EA Server Outage
20. Re: EA Server Outage Mar 11, 2010, 10:19 I've Got The News Blues
 
Verno wrote on Mar 11, 2010, 08:57:
They've only had 10 years of Battlefield games to figure it out.
That's just it. EA doesn't have that experience running a master server infrastructure for the Battlefield series or any popular FPS game because it has always farmed that out to Gamespy in the past. EA has only run the master servers for Medal of Honor Pacific and Airborne, and it has already pulled the plug on Pacific because unlike the other Medal of Honor games, no one played it. If EA wasn't such a cheap bastard and a control freak, it would have hired Gamespy to perform these functions for this game too.

Gamespy has been in the business of running a gaming server infrastructure for 15 years for a reason. It knows what it is doing because that is its core business. But, EA wanted to save some money and be able to pull the plug on the game at some point, so it is hosting the servers for this game in-house. That is the problem. EA doesn't know what the hell it is doing because it doesn't have the experience at doing this.
 
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News Comments > OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games
57. Re: OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games Mar 10, 2010, 21:42 I've Got The News Blues
 
Fang wrote on Mar 10, 2010, 21:18:
Good point. If COD:MW came out as a MMOFPS, and this was the only subscription fee to pay, I'd sign on.
You would but most other FPS players wouldn't pay a recurring fee. There has never been a widely successful FPS game sold as a subscription. Planetside is probably the best known attempt, and it is still a failure compared to the most popular traditional online FPS games. There are dozens of free FPS MMO's right now, and despite the fact that they are free, none of them are as popular as a Counterstrike, Battlefield, or Call of Duty game.

PC FPS players as a whole simply won't pay a recurring subscription fee to play online.
 
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News Comments > EA Server Outage
4. Re: EA Server Outage Mar 10, 2010, 21:26 I've Got The News Blues
 
DangerDog wrote on Mar 10, 2010, 20:44:
BF2 and BF2142 aren't down.
Thanks to Gamespy.

If EA wasn't such a tightwad and a control freak it would have used Gamespy for this game too. But, now EA would rather save some money and be able to pull the plug on its older games, and it can't do that if it uses Gamespy.

So, if you bought this game send a big thank you to EA for serving you its own dogfood.

 
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News Comments > OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games
40. Re: It's a wet dream and a pipe dream. Mar 10, 2010, 18:13 I've Got The News Blues
 
Prez wrote on Mar 10, 2010, 18:10:
Sorry Mr. Knowitall, you're right. I should have kept my mouth shut and not offered my opinion.
I apologize for the tone. My ire was more directed at OnLive than you.

This comment was edited on Mar 11, 2010, 11:42.
 
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News Comments > OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games
38. It's a wet dream and a pipe dream. Mar 10, 2010, 18:05 I've Got The News Blues
 
Prez wrote on Mar 10, 2010, 17:18:
In theory, this could be worth it to someone who has an old or proprietary PC, or is just too tech-adverse to upgrade but still wants to play PC games.
Seriously who the fuck would that be? No one who is unwilling to spend money to periodically upgrade or replace a PC is going to pay $30 or $50 per game plus a recurring subscription fee to play PC games.

PC hardware is relatively dirt-cheap and the price-performance ratio has continued to fall over the years. There are plenty of free PC games available both legally and illegally. People who want an inexpensive gaming solution are not going to turn to OnLive because it is not cheaper than the alternatives on the PC, and it is not any simpler than what is available on a game console.

OnLive is truely a solution to a problem no consumer has. It is simply a wet dream for content providers because they get complete control over the use and availability of their offerings and it eliminates piracy. As a market solution OnLive is nothing but a pipe dream.

This comment was edited on Mar 10, 2010, 18:10.
 
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News Comments > Colin McRae DiRT 2 Patches
3. Re: Colin McRae DiRT 2 Patches Mar 10, 2010, 16:07 I've Got The News Blues
 
HoSpanky wrote on Mar 10, 2010, 15:29:
Very frustrating when the game is visually HEAVILY compromised by the new patch.
Well if you were smart enough not to get the Steam version of the game, simply uninstall or revert the patch and keep playing the game as before until a real fix is released.
 
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News Comments > OnLive Launches in June: Monthly Fee Doesn't Include Games
15. I can't wait! Mar 10, 2010, 15:59 I've Got The News Blues
 
I can't wait until publishers start using this service to release game exclusives. Play BF3 and COD7 only on OnLive now, and only for a limited time because BF4 and COD8 are just around the corner. You pay a fixed fee to own rent a game AND you pay a monthly fee to keep playing it until it is retired when the sequel is released. Brilliant!
 
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News Comments > Ubisoft DRM Servers Under Fire Again
60. Re: Ubisoft DRM Servers Under Fire Again Mar 9, 2010, 02:58 I've Got The News Blues
 
raVen wrote on Mar 9, 2010, 02:40:
3rd parties are responsible for patching games via Steam, and fixing problems that arise from patches.
Actually no, Valve, has to implement and test patches for third-party games into Steam which is why they sometimes get delayed because Valve doesn't dedicate enough staff for this function. However it doesn't really matter who all is at fault for this. The point is that automatic patching on Steam isn't always update-to-date for every game.

Valve has come out and said they would release a 'patch' in that event.
No, Valve hasn't done that. It is a myth. The Steam Subscriber Agreement states otherwise, and that is the official and legally binding policy. The only such patches are the ones which come from the game cracking community.

I believe it will allow offline mode if you've already logged on with that machine. I do not know specifics.
I do unless Valve changed it in the recent fixes. The point is that offline mode should have no such restrictions which rely on stored passwords and Windows GUID's like it currently does.

And I think because the client brings other features and it 'is' the DRM I mind it less.
I would prefer Steam be like Direct2Drive where if you want to use an integrated client which is tied to your account and has community features, server lists, automatic patching, etc. you can, but you don't have to, and the DRM for each game is separate so losing access to one game doesn't disable all games, and one game can be simultaneously played on more than one PC.

There are definitely benefits to having a system which is lenient
But, Steam is not that system. If you have read the Steam Subscriber Agreement and terms of use, then you would know that there is nothing lenient about Steam. It's Valve's way or the highway.

I think Steam fits this bill: As far as I know it does prevent piracy.
You don't know very much on this issue because Steam is widely cracked. Valve has actually hardened the DRM on newer titles like L4D2, but it still has been cracked. There are limits to using cracked versions of Steam in Internet multiplayer, but because Valve's games are so popular, there are more people playing on cracked Steam servers than many other PC games legitimately.

This comment was edited on Mar 9, 2010, 03:15.
 
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News Comments > Ubisoft DRM Servers Under Fire Again
53. Re: Ubisoft DRM Servers Under Fire Again Mar 9, 2010, 02:26 I've Got The News Blues
 
ForgedReality wrote on Mar 9, 2010, 01:56:
Very lucky?
Yes, if you have never had Steam fail on you, then you are very lucky.

To prove it to yourself simply type "steam failed to" into Google and then see all the suggestions which popup like "steam failed to connect" and "steam failed to contact key server". Then click on some of the links to read about actual people having these problems. The fact that these terms are Google suggestions show just how commonplace these Steam failures are.

The point is that all DRM systems which rely on Internet authentication like Steam does will fail sometimes. It is inevitable. Just because it hasn't happened to you doesn't mean it won't. And, the more games you have which are tied to Steam, the bigger the impact it will have when it does fail.

This comment was edited on Mar 9, 2010, 12:50.
 
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News Comments > Ubisoft DRM Servers Under Fire Again
52. Re: Ubisoft DRM Servers Under Fire Again Mar 9, 2010, 02:13 I've Got The News Blues
 
raVen wrote on Mar 9, 2010, 01:29:
  • No more damn patches. I'm always up to date.
  • First, third-party games on Steam aren't always up-to-date. Sometimes the patches are late or in a few cases they don't appear at all. Stalker and Arx Fatalis are examples. Second, the way that Steam implements automatic patching eliminates choice and is too restrictive. You can't rollback a patch if it breaks your game or you discover that you otherwise don't want the patch. That has even happened with Valve's own games like L4D and TF2 on occasion where a patch broke the game until the next one arrived. Steam's automatic patching also reverts modified game files whether you want that done or not because it offers no selective control over file replacement. It's an irreversible all-or-nothing implementation.

  • One login for many games.
  • This is Steam's biggest weakness as it is a single point of failure. Steam is one big killswitch for all of your games. So, when Steam fails or you lose access to your account, you don't just lose one game, you lose all of them. No other major DRM system is so restrictive in that regard.

  • I don't even have to be online after installing. (Offline Mode)
  • Offline mode has limits to it which should be apparent to people who have multiple Steam accounts or who share their PC with others. Offline mode has also been historically unreliable although Valve has claimed to have finally fixed offline mode in two recent updates. Valve didn't explain what those fixes were though so who knows if offline mode will now work more reliably.

  • I have to log in to be able to go into offline mode.
  • which defeats the purpose of offline mode since sometimes you can't login first.

  • Friends lists, server lists, tons of other social stuff and free.
  • Xfire, Gamespy Comrade, etc. have offered these same features for years. In addition, these third-party services have much broader server lists because Steam's list is only for Steamworks games. Steam's community features are nice for those who want them, but unlike third-party solutions which are optional these features are included in the Steam client whether one wants them or not.

  • Heavy use - Launch titles HL2 basically took Steam down for days. I haven't seen anything as bad since, they have learned some good lessons.
  • Steam still regularly fails for some at every major game launch. HL2 was hardly the last time it happened.


    The real problem with your list though is that you are confusing the benefits of Steam as a game service with its DRM and restrictive policies when the two aren't mutually inclusive by necessity. It's like saying that Valve can only give you a lollipop if it also cuts off your arm. Steam DRM doesn't have to be so restrictive for the service to offer unlimited downloads. Having restrictive DRM isn't necessary for Steam to offer community and chat features. Even the Steam client could be made optional and separate from the DRM. Steam's DRM doesn't have to be a universal killswitch for all its games just so it can offer some unrelated beneficial features.

    This comment was edited on Mar 9, 2010, 02:28.
     
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    News Comments > Ubisoft DRM Servers Under Fire Again
    48. Re: Ubisoft DRM Servers Under Fire Again Mar 9, 2010, 01:34 I've Got The News Blues
     
    ForgedReality wrote on Mar 9, 2010, 01:05:
    Please; enlighten us.
    If you've always been able to play your games which require Steam and never had it fail to launch a game then you have either been very lucky, haven't used Steam for very long, or only use it infrequently.
     
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    News Comments > AMD: Games Only Use PhysX for Cash
    43. Re: AMD: Games Only Use PhysX for Cash Mar 9, 2010, 01:12 I've Got The News Blues
     
    SirKnight wrote on Mar 8, 2010, 23:27:
    Typical AMD/ATI propaganda BS. That statement, like 99% of theirs, is not true at all. AMD/ATI isn't doing jack for graphics and gaming. Nothing worthwhile anyway. They continue to play catchup to NVIDIA and at the same time spread BS to discredit them.
    Apparently you haven't taken your head out of Nvidia's ass long enough to realize that only AMD/ATI has been shipping DirectX 11 video cards thus far. Nvidia's offerings have been AWOL for months.
     
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    News Comments > AMD: Games Only Use PhysX for Cash
    42. Re: AMD: Games Only Use PhysX for Cash Mar 9, 2010, 01:09 I've Got The News Blues
     
    Creston wrote on Mar 8, 2010, 21:59:
    That said, AMD would have done the same thing had they had the opportunity, so it does seem like a bit of sour grapes.
    AMD could have done the same thing and developed its own API, but I am glad it didn't and chose to use the standards because the consumer loses with proprietary API's as it limits choice.

    This comment was edited on Mar 9, 2010, 01:21.
     
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    News Comments > AMD: Games Only Use PhysX for Cash
    41. The problem is the stifling of competition. Mar 9, 2010, 01:07 I've Got The News Blues
     
    Agent.X7 wrote on Mar 8, 2010, 21:41:
    It's not a problem at all, it's marketing.
    It IS a problem because it stifles real competition. Nvidia can't yet compete with AMD/ATI on the real merits of its cards (DirectX 11) so it intentionally prevents AMD/ATI cards from functioning with PhysX. And, Nvidia doesn't even allow PhysX to function on an Nvidia card if an AMD/ATI card is in the same PC being used for video.

    Consumers are the ones who suffer for it in lack of choice and higher prices for Nvidia cards than they could otherwise fetch in the marketplace.

    This comment was edited on Mar 9, 2010, 01:22.
     
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