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User information for Ravenger

Real Name Ravenger   
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Nickname Ravenger
Email Concealed by request
ICQ None given.
Description
Homepage http://
Signed On Apr 9, 2009, 18:34
Total Comments 10 (Suspect)
User ID 54886
 
User comment history
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News Comments > The Witcher 2 Workarounds
14. Re: The Witcher 2 Workarounds May 21, 2011, 05:12 Ravenger
 
Until the patch arrives you can do this to invert the mouse:

Edit the user.ini file (the one in your documents folder) and change the MouseSensitivityY value to a minus value.
 
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News Comments > Avalanche on Piracy, DRM, and Ports
45. Re: Avalanche on Piracy, DRM, and Ports Mar 27, 2011, 14:34 Ravenger
 
The Steam versions of Mass Effect and Dead Space don't have limited activations, and I rebought them on Steam because of that. The original versions still have the original Securom limited activations.

There are whole bunch of games that keep coming up in Steam sales that I would re-buy if they didn't have insane limited activations - Crysis and Warhead, Riddick, Batman AA, but I refuse to by any game on Steam that limits installs.

As has been said here, I wouldn't have a problem with DRM if it were patched out after a few months when peak sales had passed. The fact that this rarely happens leads me to believe that second hand sales are the target for the DRM, rather than piracy.
 
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News Comments > Crytek on Crysis 2, DRM
8. Re: Crytek on Crysis 2, DRM Mar 20, 2011, 15:24 Ravenger
 
The Steam versions of Crysis and Warhead still have Securom limited activations and it's been how long since their release? 3 years?

I'd have less of a problem with DRM if developers and publishers would at least promise to remove the DRM once the peak sales has passed. There's no point in having limited activations on a 3 year old game that sells for a fraction of the release price.

Kudos to SEGA who promised to remove the Alpha Protocol DRM within two years, and actually did it about six months after release.
 
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News Comments > More on Reclaim Your Game, Dragon Age II, and SecuROM
24. Re: More on Reclaim Your Game, Dragon Age II, and SecuROM Mar 14, 2011, 15:29 Ravenger
 
Creston wrote on Mar 14, 2011, 11:24:
And again, all for the sake of preventing retailers from breaking a street date...

The main use of the release date check is to prevent zero day piracy. The preventing of retailers breaking street dates is a just a bonus for EA.

That said, those sorts of checks should really be patched out pronto once the game has been released, otherwise if the release date servers ever go offline you've got no chance to install your game ever.
 
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News Comments > Op Ed
20. Re: Op Ed Feb 27, 2011, 11:54 Ravenger
 
Slashman wrote on Feb 27, 2011, 08:11:
Ravenger wrote on Feb 27, 2011, 04:43:
And then of course they complain that Steam is making money out of the games they discarded - like a spoiled child screaming when another child picks up the toy they threw away.

I rather like this particular analogy...

I can't take credit for it - I borrowed it from an article from MCV where the publishing director of 1c games tells how retailers said there was no demand for one of his games and that they would only take 30 copies - one for each of their main stores. He looked up the instant Steam sales figures on his laptop and said 'In the time itís taken you to tell me that there is no demand, Steam has sold 45 units'.

http://www.mcvuk.com/features/808/OPINION-Retail-vs-Steam
 
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News Comments > Op Ed
17. Re: Op Ed Feb 27, 2011, 04:43 Ravenger
 
They forgot to mention retailers. You know, the ones who are now glorified pawn shops selling second hand games in preference to new.

It seems more than a coincidence to me that PC games declined at retail when stores started over-exploiting used games. Due to DRM and CD Keys you can't sell PC games second hand, unlike console games where a single copy can be resold over and over making a fat profit each time for the store.

With their skewed business model PC games simply aren't exploitable profitable anough, so they stock less of them, in some cases not stocking them at all.

And then of course they complain that Steam is making money out of the games they discarded - like a spoiled child screaming when another child picks up the toy they threw away.
 
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News Comments > Ubisoft Considering EA-Style DLC Scheme
34. Re: Ubisoft Considering EA-Style DLC Scheme May 19, 2010, 15:13 Ravenger
 
This system must be console only, because their awful DRM system locks their PC games to a Ubisoft account - you can't sell their new PC games second hand, at least not without passing on the account details.

Still, I can understand why EA and Ubisoft want to do this '10 dollar' lock-out of online content or DLC for used copies. The high street retailers entire business model is based on used copies and promoting them over new. That's one reason they don't stock much in the way of PC games any more. They can sell the same console game several times over, making a huge profit every time, but due to DRM and CD keys they can only sell PC games once. So console games are much more profitable to them than PC games.
 
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News Comments > Silent Hunter 5: Battle of the Atlantic Patch
14. Re: Silent Hunter 5: Battle of the Atlantic Patch Mar 3, 2010, 16:27 Ravenger
 
Does their fancy DRM/Account system not auto patch then?

It's bad enough requiring an account and an always active internet connection but if you're not offering the convenience of auto patching games too that's adding insult to the injury.

If they ever release their games without this new DRM I'll buy them (I was definitely going to buy Assassin's Creed 2 before they announced the DRM). But they'd better do it fast, because once the initial excitement of the release is gone it's likely I'll lose interest and not even bother to buy them when they're in the bargain bin. Their loss, not mine as I've got plenty of other games to play.
 
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News Comments > On Riddick DRM
43. Re: On Riddick DRM Apr 16, 2009, 14:20 Ravenger
 
There's no chance of a revoke tool, as Tages have stated they will never make one.

The faq on their site says with regard to revokation:
T@GES does not -and will not- provide this service.

Companies shouldn't use limited activation DRM but if they insist on doing so they should at least:

  • Disclose the DRM scheme in full on the box and in the adverts

  • Provide a FREE, fast, 24/7 method to sort out activation problems

  • Remove the DRM after the initial sales period is over - say six months


  • Even with those rules I will never buy another limited activation game. I've been conned over this too many times already. (DRM disclosed AFTER my pre-order shipped).
     
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    News Comments > Assault on Dark Athena DRM Backlash
    35. Re: Assault on Dark Athena DRM Backlash Apr 9, 2009, 14:48 Ravenger
     
    I love the original Riddick game. I love it so much I've re-installed it every time I've bought a new PC. I've re-installed it enough times on enough different hardware configurations that I'd have run out of activations if it used the same DRM that Dark Athena has.

    Good thing I've still got the original and I can install and uninstall it whenever I want without worrying about activations. Guess I'll play that instead.

    Also it looks like Atari have tried to be sneaky about the DRM and kept it quiet and didn't disclose it on the box or in the adverts, which is something I really dislike, and which could also run foul of consumer law.

    I made a decision never to buy another limited activation DRM'd game after finding out that games had activations after I'd bought them, and I'm glad I found out about this in advance so I can make the easy decision not to buy it.

    Can't publishers see that by using these DRM schemes they're alienating their core audience? You know, the guys with money who would actually buy your game and not pirate it?
     
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    10 Comments. 1 pages. Viewing page 1.
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