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Nickname Scottish Martial Arts
Email Concealed by request - Send Mail
ICQ None given.
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Homepage http://
Signed On Jun 16, 2002, 23:16
Total Comments 2707 (Senior)
User ID 13410
 
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News Comments > Evening Metaverse
4. Re: Evening Metaverse Mar 4, 2014, 18:57 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Axis wrote on Mar 4, 2014, 17:55:
Everyone listens to music but how many know what a Clef note is?

Probably no one because a Clef is not a kind of note. But people who listen to music without understanding much of music theory or how to play an instrument are the poorer for it.

Should everyone know industry terms if they aren't part of that industry?

One would hope people are curious and seek to understand things for their own sake, but in the absence of that, people should have a bare minimum understanding of the world around them, hence education. Given the essential nature of the web to modern life in an advanced nation, people should at least have heard of HTML and know that it pertains to the web. No, they don't need to be able to markup content with HTML, or even really understand what it does or how it works, but they really ought not to think it's an STD, for the same reason people really ought not to think the sun revolves around the earth, that vaccines cause autism, or that a device which runs electrical current through your abs will allow you to lose weight without getting off the couch. I would think "HTML has something to do with the internet", would be a sufficiently low hurdle of knowledge, but given the anti-intellectual bent of our culture maybe it is.
 
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News Comments > Saturday Metaverse
25. Re: Saturday Metaverse Mar 2, 2014, 01:00 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Axis wrote on Mar 1, 2014, 23:58:
What I cannot stand is Obama and his usual lip service, it makes us look more weak and insignificant than had he said nothing at all - we've lost all credibility because every "red line" Obama puts out there is crossed and laughed at.

You are aware that foreign leaders don't get their intelligence reports on Obama from Fox News, correct? I'm only marginally supportive of Obama at best, i.e. I think he has admirable qualities but has been mostly ineffective as a president, so don't get the impression that I think his record is of unbridled strength. But that said, "strength", and the perception of it, is more than a willingness to launch misguided invasions which bog down the better part of US military strength for a decade and empower regional adversaries. Certainly, if I were a foreign adversary, I would note Obama's caution to a fault, his tendency towards paralysis by analysis, and his domestic political weakness. I would note his signaling miscalculations as the Syrian Civil War escalated, i.e. having Assad call his bluff over the chemical weapons "red line", but conversely I would recognize the wisdom of not compounding that called bluff by intervening militarily in Syria in an attempt to save face, when such intervention is highly unlikely to serve US interests. Furthermore, I would note his ready willingness to violate the sovereign territory of allied states to launch cross-border special forces and drone raids to assassinate perceived threats to US national security. I would also note his willingness to project power when there is good reason to believe it can depose an adversary, i.e. Libya. In short, my assessment would be "cautious, reluctant to intervene, but if he believes US military intervention is likely to serve US interests, rather than a mere desire to appear tough, then he is likely to use it."
 
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News Comments > Saturday Metaverse
20. Re: Saturday Metaverse Mar 1, 2014, 20:47 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Axis wrote on Mar 1, 2014, 14:06:
Hey Franken, how about you worry about the US and Britain's promise to Ukraine? That's a hell of a serious issue that NO ONE is reporting here in the US...

Obama will as usual do nothing... even when there's an 'international law' that Clinton signed...

Not that I want him to, but he's such a terrible representative of our country it's sickening. But ya, he'll just keep being "deeply concerned" or "strongly discouraged" or some other useless statement he makes as he sits back and tries to forget he's in shoes way to big for his tiny feet.

Axis, you claim to have been in the military, so clearly you must know something about military affairs. Tell me this: what military presence do we have in Ukraine? What naval presence do we have in the Black Sea? How far away is the nearest US military installation of any size? How far away is the nearest US military installation of a size sufficient to support war in Ukraine?

The answers, respectively, are none, none, about 350 miles away in Bulgaria, and about 800 miles away in Germany. Think about this for a moment: we don't have any airbases close enough to Ukraine to provide a credible deterrent from the air. We could make a handful of aerial tanker supported air strikes as a show of moral support but that's about it. Likewise, the experience of the Gulf and Iraq War demonstrate that it takes months to build up a credible land based force on foreign shores, so the Army is out as an immediate deterrent. What about the Navy? Can't we just move a few battle groups into the Black Sea? IF we get permission from the Turks to cross the Bosporus, which is no sure thing, we could conceivably do so, BUT, the Russians already have a fleet, complete with ports to repair and resupply at, in the Black Sea. We would have to fight through a blockade of the straights to move a fleet into the Black Sea, and that fleet would have to deal with both the remnants of the Russian Black Sea fleet, and the Russian Air Force which has bases throughout the region.

So what does this mean? It means that military intervention on the part of the US/EU in the Ukraine to maintain its territorial integrity would necessitate a full-scale, medium-intensity war on land, on the sea, and in the air. Is keeping ethnically Russian, and Russian speaking Crimea a part of the Ukraine worth such a war to you? Or are you just interested in blustering and finding new ways to hate Obama?
 
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News Comments > Morning Metaverse
33. Re: Morning Metaverse Feb 25, 2014, 00:34 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Cutter wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 23:57:
I guess we'll never know if people like Axis and Max are just nothing but trolls or really that delusional and stupid. Either way, what a waste of life.

Axis is real; he's just an ideologue with elaborate filters for complexity. What he says is true, and also bullshit. Why? Because reality is complex and he's presenting one part as if it is the whole.

Yes, the military does tend to be MORE conservative, but not exclusively conservative, than America at large, but only in certain respects, and for a myriad of reasons beyond his "liberals are losers and the military isn't a loser" narrative (although I wouldn't exactly call stalemate in Iraq and Afghanistan winning). Alternative explanations, each of which have a role, is that the military is a more "traditional society" profession, like farming, and thus is going to attract those who find more comfort in embracing tradition rather than changing the future, that traditional gender roles within military families tend to be strongly enforced because the constant moves make it impossible for non-military wives to work, that most bases are located in the South where the land is much cheaper, and thus more Southerner's, who tend to be conservative, get exposed to the military and its members on a more regular basis and thus are more likely to consider it an option for themselves, etc.

Likewise, Axis's assertion that no soldier enters the Army in search of violent adventure is either proof positive that he had REMF MOS, i.e. he was NOT an 11 Bravo, or he has a VERY selective memory. Some soldiers are circumspect or ambivalent about being a part of the profession of violence, others are there for no other reason than to have that chance to see a man die by their hand. Even for the former, who recognize the complex nature of war, including all of its evil, there is still the desire among professional soldiers to one day see war so that you can find out if all your training and practice made you good enough to face your enemy in combat and kill him.

Finally, my own experience of keeping in touch with the officers in my year group (I ended up getting last-minute medically disqualified shortly after being branched Infantry), is very much in line with Sepharo's. Not all of my peers were rah-rah USA #1 Republicans, although some were, to include me, but I can't think of one who doesn't now view the world in less one dimensional terms. The Army/Military as the Paragon of American Virtue and a Symbol of All That Is Good? Bullshit, it's a human institution with some very good people, and some very bad, and most somewhere in between, leading to institutional outcomes of roughly the same proportion. The American Military as Unstoppable Asskicker of Righteousness? Bullshit, it's probably the best conventional air-land force in the world, but that still didn't stop us from being fought to a stalemate by illiterate goatheaders in Afghanistan, and the notion that we could launch an invasion of democracy into Iraq sure looks pretty laughable now. Muslims as the antithesis of all that is Good, Holy, and Just? Meh, they're just people man, some good, some bad; most want the same things the rest of us do: to see their children grow to a happy and prosperous adulthood.

Does this mean all my peers turned into flaming liberals? No, most of the right-wingers are still amped up about gun rights and government spending, but they are certainly less one-dimensional and more circumspect when it comes to the issues that surround American military power and the Global War on Terror. Those who are more liberal on economic issues largely put that down to the financial crisis and its aftermath. Most were already liberal on cultural issues, i.e. gays, abortion, etc. because very few millenials toe the conservative line in that regard.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
19. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 24, 2014, 16:29 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Mad Max RW wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 16:26:
Scottish Martial Arts wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 16:24:
Mad Max RW wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 16:22:
The only thing that will turn things around is if people stop buying when it gets too expensive. Comcast will get too big until they are forced to split apart. But I hope it never changes just so I can continue watching it cause you such mental anguish.

I like how the moderator is cherry picking what posts to delete while ignoring your raging.

How utterly typical for a conservative. All set to be aggressive and offensive, until they're responded to in kind, at which point they bitch and moan and play victim.

How typical of a liberal coward putting words in a person's mouth such as claiming I support any politician or even Comcast. I dislike them, too (actually paying more than you, believe it or not) but I can afford it. Whining on a video game site does nothing.

Why identify a problem and try to find a way fix it when you can masturbate to "USA #1!!!" and bitch about communists, amirite? /modernconservatism

Furthermore, you started your participation in this thread by loudly proclaiming your opposition to Net Neutrality, something which telecom vigorously opposes, despite it being clear you don't know what the fuck Net Neutrality is. Clearly, someone trying to manipulate you told you it was bad, and you swallowed it hook line and sinker because it fit your ideological predilections. If you do vote, and if you vote in line with the bullshit you spout here, then you are indeed supporting the politicians who support Comcast's ability to exploit everyone to the country's detriment. Good job on that one.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
17. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 24, 2014, 16:24 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Mad Max RW wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 16:22:
The only thing that will turn things around is if people stop buying when it gets too expensive. Comcast will get too big until they are forced to split apart. But I hope it never changes just so I can continue watching it cause you such mental anguish.

I like how the moderator is cherry picking what posts to delete while ignoring your raging.

How utterly typical for a conservative. All set to be aggressive and offensive, until they're responded to in kind, at which point they bitch and moan and play victim.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
15. removed Feb 24, 2014, 16:16 Scottish Martial Arts
 
* REMOVED *
This comment was deleted on Feb 24, 2014, 18:36.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
13. removed Feb 24, 2014, 16:06 Scottish Martial Arts
 
* REMOVED *
This comment was deleted on Feb 24, 2014, 18:37.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
11. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 24, 2014, 15:53 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Mad Max RW wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 15:50:
Scottish Martial Arts wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 15:42:
Mad Max RW wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 11:49:
Creston wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 11:16:
We should just fucking ban Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and Time Warner altogether. Hand their networks over to local municipalities, then close them the fuck up.

You would be a big fan of the government's proposed net neutrality bill where everybody has access to the same internet speed. Although it will be slow and expensive as hell with additional fees for high traffic websites like Amazon. It's easy and "fair" to make sure everybody has shit. We don't want hurt feelings now do we?


You don't have a clue what you're talking about, do you? Why am I not surprised?

I know exactly what happens when the government tries running things. And this is what will happen. But you are a butthurt liberal statist coward and there's no point talking to you.

And you don't know what a natural monopoly is. You think that all markets are naturally competitive, and you're willing to be abused by a monopoly and see your country fall behind in infrastructure development in order to maintain that mistaken belief. In short, you are an ideologue and a moron, who can only repeat what right wing radio tells you.

 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
10. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 24, 2014, 15:52 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Creston wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 11:16:
We should just fucking ban Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and Time Warner altogether. Hand their networks over to local municipalities, then close them the fuck up.


At the very least we need vigorous anti-trust enforcement and non-captured regulators who will ensure a fair and competitive market. It's either that or make the internet a public utility, like you suggest. Keeping faith in the free market fairy will just ensure that a naturally monopolistic industry stays monopolistic, meaning crappy service, price gouging and an internet infrastructure falling rapidly behind the rest of the world, i.e. exactly where we are right now.
 
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News Comments > Morning Legal Briefs
8. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Feb 24, 2014, 15:42 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Mad Max RW wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 11:49:
Creston wrote on Feb 24, 2014, 11:16:
We should just fucking ban Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and Time Warner altogether. Hand their networks over to local municipalities, then close them the fuck up.

You would be a big fan of the government's proposed net neutrality bill where everybody has access to the same internet speed. Although it will be slow and expensive as hell with additional fees for high traffic websites like Amazon. It's easy and "fair" to make sure everybody has shit. We don't want hurt feelings now do we?


You don't have a clue what you're talking about, do you? Why am I not surprised?
 
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News Comments > D.I.C.E. Award Winners
10. Re: D.I.C.E. Award Winners Feb 7, 2014, 17:24 Scottish Martial Arts
 
The real kicker is that Diablo 3 came out in May 2012, so how would it be eligible for 2013 awards? Do ports suddenly reset the release date or something?  
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News Comments > Evening Interviews
6. Re: Evening Interviews Feb 6, 2014, 01:06 Scottish Martial Arts
 
SlimRam wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 21:41:
If someone's blind...aren't they considered disabled? *reading the bullet and scratching my head*

For a variety of obscure historical reasons, the blind are traditionally thought of as a separate category from the physically disabled, even though strictly speaking, a blind person is physically disabled. It has to do blindness and disability in the premodern era, where people born with severe disabilities generally did not survive infancy or were intentionally exposed as infants. Disability in a broad sense then generally meant something you developed later in life, as a result of an accident, or macular degeneration, or something of that nature. Since causes of blindness were generally not well understood, it seemed much more arbitrary than someone who was crippled by being thrown from a horse, for example. As a consequence, the blind and cripples were thought of as two categories, and almshouses and the like catered to the two groups separately. Cue industrialization and the development of social welfare as its own field, and social workers continued to use the same categories, i.e. the blind and the crippled being separate groups, that their pre-industrial forebearers used. Even today, you'll still see social welfare programs specifically for the blind even though, as you point out, blindness and cerebral palsy are both physical disabilities.
 
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News Comments > Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released
128. Re: Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released Feb 5, 2014, 21:32 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Beamer wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 18:37:
HorrorScope wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 18:28:
It has been determined this is not a sim, right?

No, apparently SMA out-debated me and it's officially a sim.



I love SMA, but don't think calling this a thievery sim makes even the tiniest bit of sense.

That's not at all what I said. :/
 
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News Comments > Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released
120. Re: Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released Feb 5, 2014, 13:20 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Jerykk wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 02:35:
You're right, I haven't played DX in years. However, claiming that DX wasn't any more complex than Thief is ridiculous. It had the augmentation system (with multiple upgrades for each aug), the skill system, locational damage for both the player and enemies, more weapons (with stackable upgrades), more items, more character types and more interactive objects in the environment. You could jump off a building, turn on your leg aug and then kill someone by landing on them. You could stick mines to a wall and then use them to climb up said wall. You could pick up and throw a toxic barrel at a group of enemies and then turn on your environmental protection aug and beat them to death while they choke to death. You could even kill someone by throwing enough lockpicks at them because every item and object had mass and applied variable amounts of damage on impact.

Note that I said meaningful complexity. The features you cite do not make for moment to moment gameplay that is anymore complex. For example, one of the agreed upon design flaws of Deus Ex is that many of the skills, weapons, and augs are completely useless, see Environmental Training, the plasma gun, or the Targeting Aug, leading to a relative paucity of viable character builds. The basic division was stealth/infiltration build or combat build. In essence, you have two ways to play the game, each with significant overlap, leading to a fairly standard character build, where augs become less of the game changers you describe, and are more temporary powerups, like the invisibility or slowfall potions of Thief.

I won't deny that Deus Ex has more "stuff" in it, but "more" does not necessarily translate into a richer experience. Yes, more parts mean a more complex whole, but those parts have to contribute something meaningful in order for a more complex whole to be a richer whole. In most cases, the additional complexity of Deus Ex in comparison with Thief, did not really add anything of the value which you are describing: for most moment to moment gameplay, the kinds of gameplay options the player has in Thief and Deus Ex are equal in significance.

Again, I love Deus Ex but to hold it up as a paragon of complex, emergent gameplay while simultaneously suggesting that Thief is simple and static in comparison, really isn't that accurate.
 
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News Comments > Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released
119. Re: Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released Feb 5, 2014, 13:07 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Beamer wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 11:11:
Scottish Martial Arts wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 02:02:
Beamer wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 01:33:
oh, so Doom, Civ and Dr. Mario are rpgs.

listen, I get what you're going for, but these are predefined terms. You can't call Dumb & Dumber a drama because its acted out. You can't call WalMart a department store because it has different areas separated by category.

You seem to be showing an ignorance of the history of game design, failing to grasp the significance of Ultima VI and VII with their "simulation-based" designs, and the influence that had on Ultima Underworld, designed by LGS, then Blue Sky Productions, and its spiritual successors of System Shock, Thief, and Deus Ex. What is meant by simulation in this context is that if there is a toilet, you should be able to flush it, or if you are in a kitchen, you ought to be able to cook something, or if there is a crate, it shouldn't be immovably glued to a floor, but it should be something you can pick up or push. Call of Duty, for example, is not a "simulation-based" design, because nearly the entire environment is non-interactive unless it's a plot essential door that needs to be opened or switch that needs to be flipped. If you don't want to call that a simulation, then fine, but this the terminology Origin Systems used for the design philosophy animating Ultima VI and onward, and which Looking Glass brought to their games -- remember that Warren Spector was an Origin producer, and thus heavily involved in both the mainline Ultima Series, and the Origin published LGS titles, i.e. Ultima Underworld and System Shock -- was VERY different than that in Doom.

Simulating crates that can be picked up does not make a game a sim. You're really just talking about a physics engine.

Thief didn't have toilets. Not every house even had a bathroom. And the AI certainly didn't poop. Is it a sim? No.
Duke Nukem had flushing toilets. Was it a sim? No.

If you want to use marketing speak and say that System Shock simulated more things than Doom did, fine. It was more advanced. But being more advanced doesn't make it a space marine sim.

The point is that the environment is interactive in a way that suggests an attempt to simulate a world, rather than having the environment be completely static and a mere backdrop for killing things. The goal of this particular design concept, which has subsequently been dropped as games have become simpler, was to create game environments that were as interactive as the real world and allowed people to apply real world problem solving skills to the game, i.e. rather than thinking in terms of mechanics to solve problems, you think in terms "if I were really there, what would I do?" The latter type of problem solving is only possible if the player can affect his environment in meaningful ways and if the environment responds as it would in the real world. In short, instead of static and arbitrary, i.e. all the doors are locked except for the one you need to go through, game levels, you would need to create simulated places, modeled on real world environments, featuring the kinds of interactivity you would expect if you were actually there. They never quite reached this goal, but you must admit that the latter Ultimas, Thief or Deus Ex feature worlds which are much more interactive in nature than their contemporaries.

Everyone agrees that DCS:A-10C is a sim, no? Well what makes it a sim? Generally, it is a sim because it is a realistic, interactive model of a particular aircraft, in which you can do the things you would in real life in that aircraft and the aircraft will respond accordingly. If you want to configure HOF and RPM of the CBU-97 from the inventory page of the DSMS, you can do so as you would in real life, and then when you conduct a CCRP release of the CBU-97, again as you would in real life, the burst pattern of the CBU-97 will reflect the values you inputted for HOF and RPM in the DSMS. That's why people call it a sim. Yet, if one were to create a game in which the environment is a kitchen, and you can cook in it, producing dishes based upon how you cook, it too would be a sim. Is Ultima VII a simulation of this nature? No, but it tried to approach things from the perspective of simulation -- model real world interactivity and behavior -- rather than artificial mechanics. The LGS/Ion Storm legacy of games all comes from Ultima VI and VII, for which Warren Spector was a producer, and thus were based around this idea of "less artificial mechanics, more modeling of real world behavior".

If you don't want to call it a sim, fine, no one is forcing you, but you do need to recognize that there is a fundamental difference of design approach between games like System Shock, and games like Doom or Super Mario.
 
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News Comments > Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released
110. Re: Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released Feb 5, 2014, 02:12 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Jerykk wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 02:02:
Scottish Martial Arts wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 01:55:
Jerykk wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 01:36:

Out of curiosity, how many crates could you pick up/throw/shoot in the previous Thief games? How many objects even had physics?

Pretty much all of them? Have you not played Thief or something? Secrets, both in official and fan missions, often depended upon clever crate stacking to find, and crates could often provide unintended ways of navigating levels. Frankly, it's rather bizarre that you're shit-talking Thief while holding DX as a pinnacle of design: every charge you leveled could just as easily be said of DX, i.e. you could put tools together in creative ways, but every tool was hand placed by the developer.

Huh, you're right. I totally forgot that there were some objects you could move in Thief. Probably because there was rarely any reason to.

As for DX, like I said before, its systems were far more complex than Thief's. Emergent gameplay is unintended gameplay that emerges from the interactions between systems. The more systems you have and the more complex these systems are, the greater the potential for emergent gameplay. You had augmentations which drastically changed gameplay and had multiple upgrades with varying implications. The leg augmentation that increased your movement speed, jump height and reduced fall damage made a huge difference in where you could go. Couple that with the strength aug and the wide variety of objects you could pick up and you have plenty of opportunities for emergent gameplay.

You haven't played either recently have you? Your rose-colored glasses are inflating your memory of the impact of those systems. None of them were terribly complex, and while the game was certainly more compelling and emergent than Call of Duty, it wasn't meaningfully more complex than Thief. You cite the strength aug... which gives you access to Thief style crate stacking. Encounter a locked door? In Thief, you can find a key, blow it up with a fire arrow, pick it, or find another way around. In Deus Ex, you can find a key, blow it up with a LAM, pick it with a disposable smart lock pick, or... find another way around. Or, I suppose, if the designer had specifically linked that door to a security computer, you could hack it and open the door, but then that is scripted, instead of emergent, design. Deus Ex was a great game, don't get me wrong, and still is basically the pinnacle of this kind of design, but having just finished a play through two weeks ago, I can tell you right now that these "complex systems" were not that complex, nor did they have "great potential for emergent gameplay." More emergent and simulation-oriented, yes, but hardly what you're making it out to be.
 
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News Comments > Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released
108. Re: Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released Feb 5, 2014, 02:02 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Beamer wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 01:33:
oh, so Doom, Civ and Dr. Mario are rpgs.

listen, I get what you're going for, but these are predefined terms. You can't call Dumb & Dumber a drama because its acted out. You can't call WalMart a department store because it has different areas separated by category.

You seem to be showing an ignorance of the history of game design, failing to grasp the significance of Ultima VI and VII with their "simulation-based" designs, and the influence that had on Ultima Underworld, designed by LGS, then Blue Sky Productions, and its spiritual successors of System Shock, Thief, and Deus Ex. What is meant by simulation in this context is that if there is a toilet, you should be able to flush it, or if you are in a kitchen, you ought to be able to cook something, or if there is a crate, it shouldn't be immovably glued to a floor, but it should be something you can pick up or push. Call of Duty, for example, is not a "simulation-based" design, because nearly the entire environment is non-interactive unless it's a plot essential door that needs to be opened or switch that needs to be flipped. If you don't want to call that a simulation, then fine, but this the terminology Origin Systems used for the design philosophy animating Ultima VI and onward, and which Looking Glass brought to their games -- remember that Warren Spector was an Origin producer, and thus heavily involved in both the mainline Ultima Series, and the Origin published LGS titles, i.e. Ultima Underworld and System Shock -- was VERY different than that in Doom.
 
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News Comments > Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released
107. Re: Gone Gold - Thief; New Trailer Released Feb 5, 2014, 01:55 Scottish Martial Arts
 
Jerykk wrote on Feb 5, 2014, 01:36:

Out of curiosity, how many crates could you pick up/throw/shoot in the previous Thief games? How many objects even had physics?

Pretty much all of them? Have you not played Thief or something? Secrets, both in official and fan missions, often depended upon clever crate stacking to find, and crates could often provide unintended ways of navigating levels. Frankly, it's rather bizarre that you're shit-talking Thief while holding DX as a pinnacle of design: every charge you leveled could just as easily be said of DX, i.e. you could put tools together in creative ways, but every tool was hand placed by the developer.
 
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News Comments > Saturday Tech Bits
8. Re: Saturday Tech Bits Jan 26, 2014, 02:01 Scottish Martial Arts
 
jdreyer wrote on Jan 25, 2014, 19:49:
Rifles powered by Linux purchased by US Army.

Hopefully also still powered by gunpowder.

Not sure why everyone is so butthurt about these rifles. It's just a matter of using the smaller form factor of modern embedded computing to give infantrymen the same capabilities that tankers and aviators have had for 30 years, but which 30 years ago required large vehicles with dedicated computer/avionic bays to hold the computers. It's not like the rifle ceases to be a rifle, or like it stops functioning one if there's a software crash. It's just that it's a rifle which also has built in optical sensors, rangefinders, target sharing data link, and ballistic computer to calculate firing solutions, all to enhance the effectiveness of the user. If the high tech piece of the system fails, you've still got a rifle no worse than what any other soldier carries today.
 
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