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29. Re: Star Citizen Economy Trailer Jul 8, 2013, 01:47 Flatline
 
s1mon75 wrote on Jul 8, 2013, 00:26:
Doesnt Eve already have this? But they have infinite resources, eg on server restarts asteroids that were mined out the day before are respawned.

For an economy to work such as one they have described you need finite resources (like in the real world). But no MMO to date has even attempted finite resources.

Ill be watching this one with earnest

Demand is the other half of supply & demand. If demand outstrips supply, you see a price spike. Resources come in at a finite level. Even if there's unlimited resources in each resource node, there is a very finite speed that you can put resources into the economy: It takes time to mine/gather and that time can't be sped up. That effectively acts like a finite resource. Any scarcity bottleneck will suffice to make a pseudo-economy tick. Limited resources is the most basic because that's the one we're taught to think of in school.

Plus, it's easy to put resource drains/taxes/syphons/diversions into an artificial economy. Look at most MMOs: They have all kinds of outlets to keep gold in check. It may look like a closed economy, but money comes off of mobs & from NPC vendors initially, and eventually goes back to "the system" to be destroyed through auction taxes, cost of crafting, vending, etc...

What I don't like is that there's theoretically some NPC out there counting the number of missiles shot in a dogfight and deciding that the price of those missiles needs to go up because X number of them were shot off. That kind of perfect economy information leads to extremely unusual artifacts in your economic model that end up leaving logic and experience behind. You can see an example in today's stock market. It's far more volatile than it was 20 years ago because we have clusters of computers with perfect, less-than-a-thousandth-of-a-second knowledge of the stock market updating thousands of times per second all trying to second guess each other and make transactions where each trade nets you a few cents, but then make millions of those trades in seconds. When the programming isn't spot on and certain characteristics emerge in the market, every computer freaks, and the stock market plunges 300 points in 10 seconds.

In other words, perfect knowledge market AI makes human gaming of the economy/market less and less useful. And if the ratio of AI agents to humans really is 9 to 1 like was mentioned earlier, the end result is going to be that no human endeavor is going to matter or have any lasting impact in the market.
 
 
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