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19. Re: etc., etc. Jul 27, 2012, 18:25 Ruffiana
 
Beamer wrote on Jul 27, 2012, 08:10:
Sepharo wrote on Jul 26, 2012, 22:34:
jdreyer wrote on Jul 26, 2012, 22:07:
Sepharo wrote on Jul 26, 2012, 21:47:
Why even bother putting that in the listing? They can just check it on their own when reviewing resumes.

It's a filter: if you didn't make this grade, don't even bother, we won't even look at you. But I've found in hiring that you often make a job description as your ideal candidate, but never reach that ideal, usually compromising on some things when you hire.

Oh I get that. It was more of a rhetorical question. Whoever put that in there should've known it would stir up articles like these and they could've kept the score part of it secret. "Must have worked on a critically acclaimed game."

Yeah, but every jackass argues that their flop was critically acclaimed. Like everyone says, this is an aspirational filter. It hopefully gets the guy that designed a game rated 50 to keep away so they have fewer resumes to go through.

Remember, it isn't like this is looking for an artist, it's looking for a design manager - a person directly in control of the quality of the title. As flawed as metacritic is, it's fair to pin quality of the shipped title to them, and metacritic is the only metric out there for it. I'm sure Irrational hates the metric as much as anyone else, but by putting it in there it will help keep unqualified people away.

If the design manager of New Vegas were to apply I'm sure he wouldn't be ignored because it was an 84...

You vastly overestimate how much influence an individual manager has on the quality and/or aggregate rating for a game they worked on.

The whole thing just reeks of laziness. I can't be bothered to look at the games this candidate was responsible for so if they're highly rated, they must be good and therefore he will make good games for us if we hire him. Right. No consideration for type of game, budget, timelines, genre. You think the budget doesn't have a huge impact on how well a game is received. You think the marketting budget alone doesn't have a huge impact? Explain how the design manager is responsible for the publisher refusing to pay for a quality game or properly market the game once it's done.

Arguably, failure is much more valuable experience. If you fail to make a good game, chances are you probably know exactly why. If you make a moderately successful game, you run the risk of now knowing how to make a good game and losing the drive to do better.

It's a dumb req and willing to bet that ultimately they hire someone who has more relevant experience and is a better fit personality wise, but hasn't actually worked on an 85+ rated game. That or they'll end up paying out the ass for some rock-star talent and end up with a game in the 85 range.
 
 
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