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7. Re: Morning Legal Briefs Oct 13, 2011, 18:49 Ruffiana
 
Prez wrote on Oct 13, 2011, 17:47:
Of course Avatar DVD sales were going to be comparatively low - the movie was such a box office draw because of its stunning 3D (which gave me a righteous headache, but the 3D was still amazing). Even on a 3D set, the living room experience just doesn't match the theater experience in my view.

If the theatrical 3D experience was so awesome, then why is it so wildly pirated?

Here's some numbers for "The Dark Knight"...which was not a 3D film (thank God):
http://www.the-numbers.com/movies/2008/BATM2.php
Production budget = ~$185m
Box office = $533m domestic + $468m foreign (over $1b worldwide)
DVD sales = $255m

If that film were relying on home video sales alone, it would barely be scraping by. The arguement could be made that it wouldn't have done nearly as well for not having the theatrical venue to pull in rave reviews, accolades about Ledger's performance, and the substantial marketting budget behind a "Batman" reboot.

As a general rule, movies make most of their money at the box office within the first couple of weekends off release. There's the occasional sleeper hits doesn't find an audience on their opending weekend or that slip through the box office quiety but manages to find a market through home sales. If they're lucky, and didn't cost too much to make or market in the first place, they might turn a profit. But no studio sets out with the goal of making a sleeper hit or film that will become a cult classic.

The entire film industry's business model, the metrics for success, all the things that get the money-men to pony up the real-cash money so a movie can be green-lit is projections for box-office ticket sales. If that revenue stream did not exist, or were to one day change to be less secure...guaranteed the way movies are financed, and thus the way movies are fundamentally made would radically change.
 
 
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