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79. Re: Credit cards Apr 26, 2007, 14:15 Bhruic
 
This was simply in response to people complaining that information can be stolen on the internet. It's a fact that when you transmit over the Internet, it can be viewed by anyone who wishes to take a look at your information. The only way to prevent that is by not being connected to the Internet in the first place. It was showing my point that you are exposed when you are connected to the Internet.

Hardly the only way. Any proper encryption will stop people from viewing your information.

My argument is that you make it as difficult as you can, but realize that you're not totally secure, so long as you are connected to the Internet. That is a simple fact, not opinion, btw.

It's an opinion until you can prove it. And as it's rather difficult to prove an open-ended statement, I think you're in for an uphill battle.

It only takes time to break into the computer. Experience and knowledge will shorten that time, but time is really the only factor. A knowledgeable admin will be able to shorten the time a cracker has available, and so it's simply a game after that of who gets the upper hand.

That statement is only true if you have physical access to the computer. If you are trying to hack a computer over the internet, there are plenty of OSes for which that cannot, currently, be done. Just recently there was a competition to hack MacOS remotely. No one claimed the prize (until they altered the rules to allow for attacks via browsing). And MacOS is far from the most secure OS out there.

Well, you have DRM, a controlled environment to control cheating, methods of digital distribution, ability to patch the games automatically, the gathering of computer and network information about what's connected to Steam to better tailor their games to take advantage of them. We know those as the benefits.

Wait, did you just list DRM as a benefit? You must be joking, right?

Furthermore, of the options you listed, none of them require a separate client to do so. Each could be done on an individual game basis. Which would preclude the need to run separate software.

That you can't sell the games after you purchase them? Becuase they don't want you to, should be the obvious answer. Whether you agree with that or not, that's up to you and obviously you don't.

You'd think it would be obvious, as I listed it as a negative :). The issue isn't whether or not "they" want me to, the point is, I had the ability previously, now they have taken it away from me. Even if you had no interest in taking advantage of it, removing options from the consumer is, imo, a bad thing.

Reduction of prices? I buy my games for $20 bucks from Steam, which was Red Orchestra. That's a bit cheaper than the $50 for Oblivion.

What has that got to do with anything? Or did you not understand my point? When a game comes out and it's priced at $50, it generally sells for $50. 6 months later, however, it is easy to find the game for $30. 6 months after that, you might find it for $20. However, if it came out for $50 on Steam, 12 months later, it is... $50 on Steam. For those of us who choose to delay our purchases to take advantage of that, Steam is a detriment.

And please note - you may not do so. That's fine. But once again, I'm talking about the way Steam has removed customer options - and this is one of them.

By stating that Valve can disable your entire game catalog at their whim, you are suggesting that they are an evil corporation bent on nefarious deeds.

What a completely unsubstantiated leap you just made. If I suggest they you could take a gun and shoot your neighbour, did I just suggest that you are an evil person bent on nefarious deeds? Or did I just suggest you have the ability to pick up a gun and shoot your neighbour? I don't recall ever suggesting that you have any inclination to do so. Any more than I am suggesting that Valve has any plans to do so. Once again (starting to feel like a broken record here), the point isn't about whether they are going to do it, the point is that they've removed another feature from the customer. Previously, the only thing stopping me from deciding to play a game was me. Now, I have to deal with whether or not another company is going to let me. I, as a customer, shouldn't be put into a position where I have to get permission every time I want to play one of my games. Which is, effectively, what Valve did with Steam.

Stardock simply gives their software available to download from a website. I'd hardly call that the same scale as what Steam does.

That statement is, sadly, completely inaccurate. To whit:

Stardock Central is an enhanced download manager that enables users to install and manage Stardock's software products.

As a download manager, it can securely and reliably deliver software content to users. It supports download resume, download queues, and mirrored servers.

It also includes integrated chat so users can talk to Stardock personnel directly or talk to people in the Stardock community, forums, and more.

Stardock Central is designed to allow Stardock to enhance its customer service abilities by combining software distribution, technical support, and community services into a single package


That is much more than "download from a website". You are, apparently, out of date.

I don't see the evil that other people see in Steam.

I don't see "evil" in Steam. I see it eroding the rights and privileges that we've had as customers. And I see that as a bad thing. It's much the same thing with the whole "Windows for Gamers" thing that MS has going. While I can see that there are some benefits to what they are proposing, I can also see that it will require giving up rights and privileges that PC gamers have enjoyed for awhile - ones I'm not ready to give up.

This comment was edited on Apr 26, 14:17.
 
 
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