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53. Re: No subject Nov 5, 2004, 11:45 4D-Boxing
 
I grew up in a small town in atlantic canada in the 80s... back then we had at least a douzen stores to chose from to buy clothes. Now in 2004 there is only 2 stores. This change happened in the span of a year. My father who just retired this past summer..told me "now that this big chains is here there is only one store in town where you can buy socks " All the familly stores are gone ....in other words if you want to work in my home town now, you either work at the Hospital, school, or that big retail chain.


This guy says Wal MArt is a good thing, but he will be the first one to complain about homeless jobless people asking him for change when he walks down the street. Kind of like the people who cry year after year for tax cuts and complain about youth crime... but they do not want to pay for after school programs or any type of program that would take kids of the street. It's taxes that finance all those programs & cops.

It's basically pointless to debate something like this with someone who has a limited understanding of free market economics & finances.



Demand determines what stores offer. If Wal-Mart does not offer what comsumers want, it will either change to start offering it or consumers will go elsewhere.

That is exactly the problem, there is no elswhere! Everyone else shuts down. Time to check out the reality on the groud & stop watching Lou Dobbs money line. A nation can not survive buy just having larger chains, it needs small & medium size companies to keep the economy rolling.


Small firms:


Represent more than 99.7 percent of all employers.


Employ more than half of all private sector employees.


Pay 44.5 percent of total U.S. private payroll.


Generate 60 to 80 percent of net new jobs annually.


Create more than 50 percent of nonfarm private gross domestic product (GDP).


Supplied 22.8 percent of the total value of federal prime contracts (about $50 billion) in FY 2001.


Produce 13 to 14 times more patents per employee than large patenting firms. These patents are twice as likely as large firm patents to be among the one percent most cited.


Are employers of 39 percent of high tech workers (such as scientists, engineers, and computer workers).


Are 53 percent home-based and 3 percent franchises.


Made up 97 percent of all identified exporters and produced 29 percent of the known export value in FY 2001.



Sources: U.S. Bureau of the Census; Advocacy-funded research by Joel Popkin and Company (Research Summary #211); Federal Procurement Data System; Advocacy-funded research by CHI Research, Inc. (Research Summary #225); Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey; U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration italic text



 
 
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