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Stardock's DRM Goo

Stardock unveils their promised plans for Game Object Obfuscation (Goo), a system they feel is a more elegant alternative to current Digital Rights Management, especially for downloaded games. Goo will be part of the launch of Impulse Reactor phase 3 on April 7, offering a way for publishers to protect their games from piracy with a one-time online activation:

PLYMOUTH, MI, March 25, 2009 – Stardock announced today that the forthcoming update to its digital distribution platform, Impulse, will include a new technology aimed to pave the way to solving some of the common complaints of digital distribution.

The new technology, known as Game Object Obfuscation (Goo), is a tool that allows developers to encapsulate their game executable into a container that includes the original executable plus Impulse Reactor, Stardock’s virtual platform, into a single encrypted file.

When a player runs the game for the first time, the Goo’d program lets the user enter in their email address and serial number which associates their game to that person as opposed to a piece of hardware like most activation systems do. Once validated, the game never needs to connect to the Internet again.

Goo has a number of unique advantages that developer Stardock believes both gamers and developers will appreciate:

1. There is no third-party client required. This means a developer can use this as a universal solution since it is not tied to any particular digital distributor.
2. It paves the way to letting users validate their game on any digital distribution service that supports that game. One common concern of gamers is if the company they purchased a game from exits the market, their game library may disappear too. Games that use Goo would be able to be validated anywhere.
3. It opens the door to gamers being able to resell their games because users can voluntarily disable their game access and transfer their license ownership to another user.

“One of our primary goals for Impulse Reactor is to create a solution that will appeal to game developers while adhering to the Gamers Bill of Rights,” said Brad Wardell, president & CEO of Stardock. “Publishers want to be able to sell their games in as many channels as possible but don’t want to have to implement a half-dozen ‘copy protection’ schemes. Game Object Obfuscation lets the developer have a single game build that can be distributed everywhere while letting gamers potentially be able to re-download their game later from any digital service. Plus, it finally makes possible a way for gamers and publishers to transfer game licenses to players in a secure and reliable fashion.”

Because Goo ties the game to a user’s account instead of the hardware, gamers can install their game to multiple computers without hassle.

Goo will be released on April 7 as part of the upcoming Impulse: Phase 3 release. Stardock also expects to be able to announce multiple major publishers making use of Goo in April as well as adding their libraries to Impulse.

Impulse is poised to exceed one million customers in the next week despite only being launched nine months ago.

To learn more about Impulse, visit www.impulsedriven.com.

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20. Re: Stardock's DRM Goo Mar 25, 2009, 16:38 beigemore
 
Wow, they still just don't get it. I don't mind having to enter a serial number to play a game online, but there's no way in hell I'm going to pay for a computer game that requires activation just to play single player mode. I am a firm believer of paying for games you enjoy. I really want to purchase Mass Effect for PC even though I've finished it on 360 several times, and I really want to play Dead Space for PC, as well, but unfortunately I cannot due my absolute disagreement with the restrictions placed on their licenses.

Guess I'll be sticking with MMO's and QuakeLive for an indefinite amount of time now.
 
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